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I have a procedure that creates an object based on user input using a SELECT...CASE statement:

Dim hash As HashAlgorithm

' Make sure hashing algorithm name is specified.
If (hashAlgorithm Is Nothing) Then
    hashAlgorithm = ""
End If

' Initialize appropriate hashing algorithm class.
Select Case hashAlgorithm.ToUpper()
    Case "SHA1"
        hash = New SHA1Managed()
    Case "SHA256"
        hash = New SHA256Managed()
    Case "SHA384"
        hash = New SHA384Managed()
    Case "SHA512"
        hash = New SHA512Managed()
    Case Else
        hash = New MD5CryptoServiceProvider()
End Select

VS Analyzer complains that I am not disposing of the object in each instance of the SELECT...CASE. So if the user supplied "SHA1" as the algorithm type, then hash is set to a new SHA1Managed object. Why would I need to dispose the New SHA256Managed class that was never created?

But...If I simply dispose the hash object at the end of the procedure:

hash.dispose()

Analyzer complains that I haven't disposed the SHA1Managed, SHA256Managed, SHA384Managed, SHA512Managed, and MD5CryptoServiceProvider objects...of which 4 were never created anyway...

I cannot use Using hash as HashAlgorithm because the object has to be instantiated within the Using Statement.

I'm thinking that perhaps the code analyzer is simply targeting New <Object> statements and that I'm cool, but I wanted to come here for some opinions...

EDIT: Ok Apparantly it wasn't clear so here is a very simple, small, complete procedure to work with:

Public Shared Function HashMe(ByVal plainText As String, ByVal hash2use As String) As Byte()
    Dim myHash As HashAlgorithm
    Select Case hash2use.ToUpper
        Case "SHA1"
            myHash = New SHA1Managed()
        Case "SHA256"
            myHash = New SHA256Managed()
        Case "SHA384"
            myHash = New SHA384Managed()
        Case "SHA512"
            myHash = New SHA512Managed()
        Case Else
            myHash = New MD5CryptoServiceProvider()
    End Select
    Return myHash.ComputeHash(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(plainText))
    myHash.Dispose()
End Function

This procedure will work just fine, except that VS Analyzer wants me to dispose all of the New <Object> called within the SELECT CASE

The answer to wrap it in a Using block is invalid and will not compile.

share|improve this question
1  
Very strange. I tried it with VS 2012 and ran code analysis on exactly what you put in, and it returned no issues. – Dave Markle Jul 12 '13 at 12:22
    
Interesting. They must have improved the analyzer. As I suspected, the problem was with the code analyzer. Thanks for your input. I actually had the post tagged with visual-studio-2010 but someone felt the need to remove that tag @DaveMarkle – KacireeSoftware Jul 12 '13 at 18:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Can you do something like this...

Public Shared Function HashMe(ByVal plainText As String, ByVal hash2use As String) As Byte()
    Dim returnHash As Byte()
    Select Case hash2use.ToUpper
        Case "SHA1"
            Using (HashAlgorith hashAlgorith = new HashAlgorith())
                returnHash = hashAlgorith.ComputeHash(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(plainText))
            End Using
        ... do the same for the other cases ...
    End Select
    Return returnHash
End Function
share|improve this answer
    
mmmm, I'll give it a try – KacireeSoftware Jul 12 '13 at 1:01
    
Yeah, code analyzer liked that...interesting – KacireeSoftware Jul 12 '13 at 1:06

Well, the easiest way to do it would be to just put it in a using block to begin with and create the instance in a function. HashAlgorithm has a method that does exactly what you are doing.

I don't remember the syntax of vb.net, but you would do something like this

Using hash as HashAlgorithm = HashAlgorithm.Create(hashAlgorithm)
    ' use the algorithm here
End Using

If you want to roll your own method, it would be something like this

Public Shared Function CreateHashAlgorithm(ByVal hash as String)
    Select Case hash.ToUpper
        Case "SHA1"
            Return New SHA1Managed()
        Case "SHA256"
            Return New SHA256Managed()
        Case "SHA384"
            Return New SHA384Managed()
        Case "SHA512"
            Return New SHA512Managed()
        Case Else
            Return New MD5CryptoServiceProvider()
    End Select
End Function

Then you would use it like so

Using hash as HashAlgorithm = CreateHashAlgorithm(algorithm)
    Byte() data = hash.ComputeHash(whatever)
End Using

Now, that said, I don't think you completely understand the case statement because there aren't multiple objects being created, only one, because only one case statement will be matched.

That said, here's the c# version of this that you can run through a converter if you wish.

using (HashAlgorithm hash = HashAlgorithm.Create(algorithm))
{
    // use the algorithm
}

// if we want to make our own version of HashAlgorith.Create()
public HashAlgorithm CreateHashAlgorithm(string algorithm)
{
    algorithm = algorithm ?? "";
    switch(algorithm.ToUpper())
    {
        case "SHA1": return new SHA1Managed();
        case "SHA256": return new SHA256Managed();
        // and the rest
        default: return new MD5CryptoServiceProvider();
    }
}

// and to use it
using (HashAlgorithm hash = CreateHashAlgorithm(algorithm))
{
    byte[] data = hash.ComputeHash(whatever);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Darren...no, that's wrong. It doesn't compile and it breaks the intent of the SELECT...CASE – KacireeSoftware Jul 12 '13 at 0:15
    
it doesn't break the intent, as it's likely that you are accepting bad input and throwing everything else into the MD5, which is still possible if you scrub the data before hand. The code has been updated to fix the trailing ), but if you look at the documentation for HashAlgorithm.Create you'll see that it does exactly what you are doing. – Darren Kopp Jul 12 '13 at 0:19
    
Well, it doesn't compile, sorry. I added a small, complete procedure to my OP for you to test, but your answer won't compile – KacireeSoftware Jul 12 '13 at 0:32
    
I would be happy to look at a c# answer if you're more comfortable with that – KacireeSoftware Jul 12 '13 at 0:35
    
added what i was talking about and a c# version – Darren Kopp Jul 12 '13 at 0:47

The reason you're being warned about the function is because your HashAlgorithm won't be Dispose()d if an exception gets thrown before .Dispose() is called.

The most straightforward answer, preserving what you've already written, is to call Dispose() in finally{} block like so:

    Public Shared Function HashMe(ByVal plainText As String, ByVal hash2use As String) As Byte()
        Dim myHash As HashAlgorithm
try 
        Select Case hash2use.ToUpper
            Case "SHA1"
                myHash = New SHA1Managed()
            Case "SHA256"
                myHash = New SHA256Managed()
            Case "SHA384"
                myHash = New SHA384Managed()
            Case "SHA512"
                myHash = New SHA512Managed()
            Case Else
                myHash = New MD5CryptoServiceProvider()
        End Select
        Return myHash.ComputeHash(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(plainText))
end try 
finally
        myHash.Dispose()
end finally
End Function
share|improve this answer
    
I agree with your answer, to wrap it in a try...catch...finally block to insure the object is disposed. It actually IS that way in my complete procedure, which you couldn't have known...but the code analyzer isn't complaining about object "myHash"...it sees THAT is being disposed. It's complaining about (New SHA1Managed) not being disposed, which I think is ridiculous – KacireeSoftware Jul 12 '13 at 0:56
    
I think the finally block should check to ensure that myHash is non-null before calling Dispose, should it not? Otherwise if an exception occurs at some time prior to myHash being written (e.g. because one of the constructors throws) the calling code will see a NullReferenceException on the dispose, and any information about the original exception will be lost. – supercat Jul 12 '13 at 17:42

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