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Hi please kindly explain to me why is the code generating an error,

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){
    char ***x;
    char **q = *x;
    char **(*c) = x;
    char ***d = &q;
    char ***p = "asdasd";

    x=p;

    printf("d:%s\n",d);
    printf("q:%s\n",q);
    printf("x:%s\n",x);


return 0;

}

Output: 1 Segmentation fault

Hi Thanks for the replys so if I init x, i still got an Segmentation fault on

printf("q:%s\n",q);

the output and code is shown below, please kindly advise why is d:1231 instead of 1231123124 and why x=p only change the value of x instead of all (x, q, d)

int main(){
    char ***x = "1231123124";
    char **q = *x;
    char **(*c) = x;
    char ***d = &q;
    char ***p = "asdasd";

    x=p;

    printf("p:%s\n",p);
    printf("d:%s\n",d);
//  printf("q:%s\n",q);
    printf("x:%s\n",x);
    printf("c:%s\n",c);

    return 0;
}

Output: p:asdasd

d:1231

x:asdasd

c:1231123124

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What do you think it should do? –  Brian Cain Jul 12 '13 at 0:04
    
x undefined and all others followed. P is another undefined. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 12 '13 at 0:04
    
You've become a Three Star Programmer. –  tangrs Jul 12 '13 at 0:21
    
Compile with warning level set high, and do not ignore the warnings. –  Jim Balter Jul 12 '13 at 1:08
    
>BANG< >BANG< >BANG< >BANG< >BANG< ...... –  Martin James Jul 12 '13 at 8:21

2 Answers 2

char **q = *x;

Here you are dereferencing an uninitialized pointer.

It's undefined behaviour, in this case it usually results a segfault (in practice your code will try to dereference some random memory location, or NULL if your compiler initializes local variables (this is typical for debug/non-optimized builds)).

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thanks, but if i add char ***x = "12312"; i still got error from Segmentation fault printf("q:%s\n",q); line –  user1998844 Jul 12 '13 at 0:17
    
@user1998844 Please learn what char ***x means before using it. –  Jim Balter Jul 12 '13 at 1:06

These are type errors.

printf("d:%s\n",d); // d is char***, not char*
printf("q:%s\n",q); // q is char**, not char*
printf("x:%s\n",x); // x is char***, not char*

The %s specifier expects a char * argument, or possibly void *, const char *, etc., but never a char ** or char ***.

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