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In Go, string is a primitive type, it's readonly, every manipulation to it will create a new string.

So, if I want to concatenate strings many times without knowing the length of the resulting string, what's the best way to do it?

The naive way would be:

s := "";
for i := 0; i < 1000; i++ {
    s += getShortStringFromSomewhere();
}
return s;

but that does not seem very efficient.

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6 Answers

up vote 109 down vote accepted

The best way is to use the bytes package. It has a Buffer class, which implements io.Writer.

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    var buffer bytes.Buffer

    for i := 0; i < 1000; i++ {
        buffer.WriteString("a")
    }

    fmt.Println(buffer.String())
}

This does it in O(n) time.

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6  
Is this technique Unicode-clean? –  Kevin Reid Oct 27 '11 at 1:49
5  
Yes. Almost everything in Go is Unicode-clean. –  Mostafa Jan 30 '12 at 7:39
7  
instead of println(string(buffer.Bytes())); use could just do println(buffer.String()) –  FigmentEngine Feb 13 '12 at 4:52
7  
Instead of buffer := bytes.NewBufferString(""), you can do var buffer bytes.Buffer. You also don't need any of those semicolons :). –  crazy2be Jun 9 '12 at 23:52
2  
Incredibly fast. Made some naive "+" string concat in my program go from 3 minutes to 1.3 seconds. –  Malcolm Sep 17 '13 at 16:34
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There is a library function in the strings package called "Join": http://golang.org/pkg/strings/#Join

A look at the code of "Join" shows a similar approach to Append function Kinopiko wrote: http://golang.org/src/pkg/strings/strings.go?s=8508:8548#L346

Usage:

import (
    "fmt";
    "strings";
)

func main() {
    s := []string{"this", "is", "a", "joined", "string\n"};
    fmt.Printf(strings.Join(s, " "));
}

$ ./test.bin
this is a joined string
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1  
Doesn't work when you have to loop over something that isn't a []string. –  Malcolm Sep 17 '13 at 16:34
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I just benchmarked the top answer posted above in my own code (a recursive tree walk) and the simple concat operator is actually faster than the BufferString.

func (r *record) String() string {
    buffer := bytes.NewBufferString("");
    fmt.Fprint(buffer,"(",r.name,"[")
    for i := 0; i < len(r.subs); i++ {
        fmt.Fprint(buffer,"\t",r.subs[i])
    }
    fmt.Fprint(buffer,"]",r.size,")\n")
    return buffer.String()
}

This took 0.81s, whereas the following code:

func (r *record) String() string {
    s := "(\"" + r.name + "\" ["
    for i := 0; i < len(r.subs); i++ {
        s += r.subs[i].String()
    }
    s += "] " + strconv.FormatInt(r.size,10) + ")\n"
    return s
} 

only took 0.61s. This is probably due to the overhead of creating the new BufferStrings.

Update: I also benchmarked the join function and it ran in 0.54s

func (r *record) String() string {
    var parts []string
    parts = append(parts, "(\"", r.name, "\" [" )
    for i := 0; i < len(r.subs); i++ {
        parts = append(parts, r.subs[i].String())
    }
    parts = append(parts, strconv.FormatInt(r.size,10), ")\n")
    return strings.Join(parts,"")
}
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5  
I believe the OP was more concerned about memory complexity rather than runtime complexity, given the fact that naive string concatenations result in new memory allocations each time. –  galaktor Aug 16 '12 at 19:30
2  
The slow speed of this might well be related to using fmt.Fprint instead of buffer.WriteString("\t"); buffer.WriteString(subs[i]); –  Robert Jack Will Aug 13 '13 at 9:04
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You could create a big slice of bytes and copy the bytes of the short strings into it using string slices. There is a function given in "Effective Go":

func Append(slice, data[]byte) []byte {
    l := len(slice);
    if l + len(data) > cap(slice) {	// reallocate
    	// Allocate double what's needed, for future growth.
    	newSlice := make([]byte, (l+len(data))*2);
    	// Copy data (could use bytes.Copy()).
    	for i, c := range slice {
    		newSlice[i] = c
    	}
    	slice = newSlice;
    }
    slice = slice[0:l+len(data)];
    for i, c := range data {
    	slice[l+i] = c
    }
    return slice;
}

Then when the operations are finished, use string ( ) on the big slice of bytes to convert it into a string again.

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It's interesting that there are so many ways to do this in Go. –  Doctor Evil Nov 16 '12 at 5:21
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The builtin and efficient way certainly is

 s12 := fmt.Sprint(s1,s2)
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4  
It's not built in and it's not efficient. –  peterSO Jul 2 '13 at 14:38
    
Importing a package (like fmt) means it's not builtin. It's in the standard library. –  Malcolm Sep 17 '13 at 16:33
    
It's slow only because it uses reflection on it's arguments. It's efficent. Otherwise it's not less efficient than joining with strings.Join –  ithkuil Nov 11 '13 at 17:07
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s := fmt.Sprintf("%s%s", []byte(s1), []byte(s2))
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This is solution very slow, because it uses reflection, it parses the format string, and it makes a copy of the data for the []byte(s1) conversion. Comparing it with other solutions posted, can you name a single advantage of your solution? –  pts Dec 4 '13 at 22:34
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