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RANDOM prints different output:

[root@manage /root]# echo $RANDOM
7207
[root@manage /root]# echo $RANDOM
8761
[root@manage /root]# echo $RANDOM
29922

RANDOM prints Same output:

[root@manage /root]# value=`echo $RANDOM`
[root@manage /root]# echo $value 
5286
[root@manage /root]# value=`echo $RANDOM`
[root@manage /root]# echo $value
5286
[root@manage /root]# value=`echo $RANDOM`
[root@manage /root]# echo $value
5286

I can't get this strange behavior. Can anyone help me to solve it?

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Simple solution is value=$RANDOM, but that doesn't answer why $(echo $RANDOM) prints the same thing on every invocation (memoizing?). –  tjameson Jul 12 '13 at 5:51
3  
i wasn't able to reproduce the issue. can you check your variables again? –  Antarus Jul 12 '13 at 5:55
2  
I can reproduce it in zsh, but not in bash. Related: lists.gnu.org/archive/html/bug-bash/2005-01/msg00239.html. Perhaps zsh didn't get the memo? Test case: echo $(echo $RANDOM). Seems the seed isn't getting regenerated in subshells. –  tjameson Jul 12 '13 at 6:02
    
@user95711 which shell are you using? echo $SHELL –  Antarus Jul 12 '13 at 6:05
    
GNU bash, version 1.14.7(1) –  user95711 Jul 12 '13 at 6:10
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1 Answer 1

The reason why you are seeing it is because every time echo $RANDOM is run, it is run on a new 'shell' and hence it has the same starting seed value. Try echo $RANDOM; echo $RANDOM and you will see different numbers. btw, I dont see the behavior in BASH, but I see it in ZSH.

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