Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I used to work with the reshape library and switched to reshape2 as it is supposed to be faster.

But I obtain very strange results as outputs of the recast function :

  • Using reshape::recast, I obtain a proper dataframe the way I want it.
  • Using reshape2::recast, I obtain a list with labels data (which is the matrix that I would want to see as my result dataframe) and labels which is itself a list containing my x-axis and y-axis labels.

I know it's possible to reconstruct my dataframe the way I want it from there but can't it be done directly ?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could define your own function by simply adding a mere d to the recast code:

redcast <- function (data, formula, ..., id.var, measure.var) {
  if (any(c("id.vars", "measure.vars") %in% names(match.call()))) {
    stop("Use var, not vars\n")
  }
  molten <- melt(data, id.var, measure.var)
  dcast(molten, formula, ...)
}

redcast(french_fries, time ~ variable, id.var = 1:4)

# Aggregation function missing: defaulting to length
#    time potato buttery grassy rancid painty
# 1     1     72      72     72     72     72
# 2     2     72      72     72     72     72
# 3     3     72      72     72     72     72
# 4     4     72      72     72     72     72
# 5     5     72      72     72     72     72
# 6     6     72      72     72     72     72
# 7     7     72      72     72     72     72
# 8     8     72      72     72     72     72
# 9     9     60      60     60     60     60
# 10   10     60      60     60     60     60
share|improve this answer
    
I agree with your solution here (+1) but do you think that this is maybe an oversight for what is possibly an under-utilized function? The only think that I can think of is that this was designed to work with both dcast and acast, hence the conversion to a list, but not sure why there isn't a function that "reassembles" the output. –  Ananda Mahto Aug 2 '13 at 5:32
    
I don't know. I don't see a need for this function. It only saves one line of code and "imposes [additional] cognitive burden" (to cite Hadley). –  Roland Aug 2 '13 at 7:21
    
that's sort of what I mean. It doesn't seem to be well-advertised, and I can't quite figure out why it exists to begin with.... –  Ananda Mahto Aug 2 '13 at 7:23
    
I accepted the answer because that is what I ended up doing but I still think it should be done at the original function level, if for nothing else, to be consistent with the previous behavior of the function. –  Chapo Aug 28 '13 at 10:05
    
Also I don't agree with the previous comments on the use case for recast. I very rarely use melt or cast by themselves so recast is a big help. –  Chapo Aug 28 '13 at 10:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.