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I have two hashes:

hash1 = {1 => "a" , 2 => "b" , 3 => "c" , 4 => "d"} 
hash2 = {3 => "hello", 4 => "world" , 5 => "welcome"} 

I need a hash which contains common keys in both hashes:

hash3 = {3 => "hello" , 4 => "world"}

Is it possible to do it without any loop?

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1  
Without any loop no. Why don't you want to use loops? –  Jefffrey Jul 12 '13 at 6:54
2  
I guess he means "without coding the loop myself and use some built-in method". –  Koraktor Jul 12 '13 at 6:56
    
see my answer. Its not using any loop. It may help you. Thanks. –  Jyothu Jul 12 '13 at 7:04
1  
Do you care what the values are, or just that the keys are the intersection of the given hashes' keys? –  Amit Kumar Gupta Jul 12 '13 at 7:09
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3 Answers 3

hash3 = hash1.keep_if { |k, v| hash2.key? k }

This won't have the same effect as the code in the question, instead it will return:

hash3 #=> { 3 => "c", 4 => "d" }

The order of the hashes is important here. The values will always be taken from the hash that #keep_if is send to.

hash3 = hash2.keep_if { |k, v| hash1.key? k }
#=> {3 => "hello", 4 => "world"}
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1  
it gives hash3={3=>"c", 4=>"d"} but user require- hash3 = {3 => "hello" , 4 => "world"} –  Ravendra Kumar Jul 12 '13 at 7:04
    
See my edited answer. –  Koraktor Jul 12 '13 at 7:06
    
yes now it works –  Ravendra Kumar Jul 12 '13 at 7:16
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I'd go with this:

hash1 = {1 => "a" , 2 => "b" , 3 => "c" , 4 => "d"} 
hash2 = {3 => "hello", 4 => "world" , 5 => "welcome"} 

Hash[(hash1.keys & hash2.keys).zip(hash2.values_at(*(hash1.keys & hash2.keys)))]
=> {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}

Which can be reduced a bit to:

keys = (hash1.keys & hash2.keys)
Hash[keys.zip(hash2.values_at(*keys))]

The trick is in Array's & method. The documentation says:

Set Intersection — Returns a new array containing elements common to the two arrays, excluding any duplicates. The order is preserved from the original array.


Here are some benchmarks to show what is the most efficient way to do this:

require 'benchmark'

HASH1 = {1 => "a" , 2 => "b" , 3 => "c" , 4 => "d"} 
HASH2 = {3 => "hello", 4 => "world" , 5 => "welcome"} 

def tinman
  keys = (HASH1.keys & HASH2.keys)
  Hash[keys.zip(HASH2.values_at(*keys))]
end

def user2564200
  HASH2.select {|key, value| HASH1.has_key? key }
end
def user2564200_2
  HASH2.select {|key, value| HASH1[key] }
end

def priti
  HASH2.select{|k,v| HASH1.assoc(k) }
end

def koraktor
  HASH1.keep_if { |k, v| HASH2.key? k }
end
def koraktor2
  HASH2.keep_if { |k, v| HASH1.key? k }
end

N = 1_000_000
puts RUBY_VERSION
puts "N= #{N}"

puts [:tinman, :user2564200, :user2564200_2, :priti, :koraktor, :koraktor2].map{ |s| "#{s.to_s} = #{send(s)}" }
Benchmark.bm(11) do |x|
  x.report('tinman') { N.times { tinman() }}
  x.report('user2564200_2') { N.times { user2564200_2() }}
  x.report('user2564200') { N.times { user2564200() }}
  x.report('priti') { N.times { priti() }}
  x.report('koraktor') { N.times { koraktor() }}
  x.report('koraktor2') { N.times { koraktor2() }}
end

Ruby 1.9.3-p448:

1.9.3
N= 1000000
tinman = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
user2564200 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
user2564200_2 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
priti = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
koraktor = {3=>"c", 4=>"d"}
koraktor2 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
                  user     system      total        real
tinman        2.430000   0.000000   2.430000 (  2.430030)
user2564200_2  1.000000   0.020000   1.020000 (  1.003635)
user2564200   1.090000   0.010000   1.100000 (  1.104067)
priti         1.350000   0.000000   1.350000 (  1.352476)
koraktor      0.490000   0.000000   0.490000 (  0.484686)
koraktor2     0.480000   0.000000   0.480000 (  0.483327)

Running under Ruby 2.0.0-p247:

2.0.0
N= 1000000
tinman = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
user2564200 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
user2564200_2 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
priti = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
koraktor = {3=>"c", 4=>"d"}
koraktor2 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
                  user     system      total        real
tinman        1.890000   0.000000   1.890000 (  1.882352)
user2564200_2  0.710000   0.010000   0.720000 (  0.735830)
user2564200   0.790000   0.020000   0.810000 (  0.807413)
priti         1.030000   0.010000   1.040000 (  1.030018)
koraktor      0.390000   0.000000   0.390000 (  0.389431)
koraktor2     0.390000   0.000000   0.390000 (  0.389072)

Koraktor's original code doesn't work, but he turned it around nicely with his second code pass, and walks away with the best speed. I added the user2564200_2 method to see what effect removing key? would have. It sped the routine up a little, but not enough to catch up to Koraktor's.


Just for documentation purposes, I tweaked Koraktor's second code to remove the key? method also, and shaved more time from it. Here's the added method and the new output:

def koraktor3
  HASH2.keep_if { |k, v| HASH1[k] }
end

1.9.3
N= 1000000
tinman = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
user2564200 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
user2564200_2 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
priti = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
koraktor = {3=>"c", 4=>"d"}
koraktor2 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
koraktor3 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
                  user     system      total        real
tinman        2.380000   0.000000   2.380000 (  2.382392)
user2564200_2  0.970000   0.020000   0.990000 (  0.976672)
user2564200   1.070000   0.010000   1.080000 (  1.078397)
priti         1.320000   0.000000   1.320000 (  1.318652)
koraktor      0.480000   0.000000   0.480000 (  0.488613)
koraktor2     0.490000   0.000000   0.490000 (  0.490099)
koraktor3     0.390000   0.000000   0.390000 (  0.389386)

2.0.0
N= 1000000
tinman = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
user2564200 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
user2564200_2 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
priti = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
koraktor = {3=>"c", 4=>"d"}
koraktor2 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
koraktor3 = {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
                  user     system      total        real
tinman        1.840000   0.000000   1.840000 (  1.832491)
user2564200_2  0.720000   0.010000   0.730000 (  0.737737)
user2564200   0.780000   0.020000   0.800000 (  0.801619)
priti         1.040000   0.010000   1.050000 (  1.044588)
koraktor      0.390000   0.000000   0.390000 (  0.387265)
koraktor2     0.390000   0.000000   0.390000 (  0.388648)
koraktor3     0.320000   0.000000   0.320000 (  0.327859)
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Thanx for ur answer,it works ........ –  user2575339 Jul 12 '13 at 7:16
    
Thanks. Look at the benchmark. user2564200's code, with a minor tweak, is the fastest. –  the Tin Man Jul 12 '13 at 7:44
    
Korator is the fastest. You changed your code after I wrote the benchmark, so, while yours now reflects using Hash[], it originally used assoc as evidenced in the edit history. –  the Tin Man Jul 12 '13 at 7:51
    
No, you saved your change while the benchmarks were being written and run, which is why yours appears before mine. If you had saved yours before I copied the methods it would have been included. It's a moot point anyway, because yours is not the fastest, nor will any tweaking change that. –  the Tin Man Jul 12 '13 at 8:18
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> hash2.select {|key, value| hash1.has_key? key }
=> {3=>"hello", 4=>"world"}
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