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Consider the following String, which is a table of content extracted from a pdf, like in the following example, two topics can be on one line, there is one line break at the end of each line (like in the example)

A — N° 1 2 janvier 2013

TABLE OF CONTENT

Topic à one ......... 30 Second Topic .......... 33
Third - one ......... 3 Topic.with.dots .......... 33
One more line ......................... 27 last topic ...... 34

I want to extract the section's name 'Topic à one', 'Second Topic', 'Third -one', 'Topic.with.dots', 'One more line' and 'last topic'

Any insights for a matching regex?

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1  
Which regex engine are you using? Please always add a corresponding tag to any regex question. Thanks! –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 12 '13 at 8:20
1  
Which characters are allowed in a section name? –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 12 '13 at 8:21
    
@Tim I use Ruby 2 –  denisjacquemin Jul 12 '13 at 8:24
    
@Tim A topic can contains the following characters a A à . - –  denisjacquemin Jul 12 '13 at 8:26
2  
Define what "this is a String, they are not multiple lines" means? A string can contain multiple lines if it has line-breaks. Is the sample one long string that actually wraps but you broke it to fit in the page, or does it have line-breaks internally, resulting in the displayed text? –  the Tin Man Jul 12 '13 at 8:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
string = "A — N° 1 2 janvier 2013

TABLE OF CONTENT

Topic à one ......... 30 Second Topic .......... 33
Third - one ......... 3 Topic.with.dots .......... 33
One more line ......................... 27 last topic ...... 34"
puts string.scan(/(\p{l}[\p{l} \.-]*)\s+\.+\s+\d+/i).flatten

This does what you want. It also matches single letter titles.

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1  
I'd suggest to add a ? after the first +, and maybe use [ \t] instead of \s, and use /i. –  Qtax Jul 12 '13 at 8:30
    
@Qtax Why [ \t] instead of \s? –  Chris Wesseling Jul 12 '13 at 8:36
    
So that a match can't spend multiple lines (in case of some odd text). –  Qtax Jul 12 '13 at 8:40
    
@Chris works fine, except that it doesn't handle special characters like à - I edited the question to reflect this requirement, i will probably find the solution myself, thanks –  denisjacquemin Jul 12 '13 at 8:52
    
@denisjacquemin I've adjusted it for your special chars. You didn't adjust your expectations; I take it you want to match 'Topic à one` and not 'Topic one'.... These are my first lines of ruby ever ;-) –  Chris Wesseling Jul 12 '13 at 9:15
string.scan(/(\S.*?)\s+\.{2,}\s+\d+/).flatten
# =>
[
  "Topic one",
  "Second Topic",
  "Third one",
  "Topic.with.dots",
  "One more line",
  "last topic"
]
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Similar to @sawa's:

puts text.scan(/([a-zA-Z .]+?) \.\.++ \d+/).flatten.map(&:strip)
# >> Topic one
# >> Second Topic
# >> Third one
# >> Topic.with.dots
# >> One more line
# >> last topic

(I like his pattern better though.)

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The following (unoptimized yet) regex works on your example:

(?i)(?=[A-Z])(?:\.[A-Z-]+|[A-Z -]+)+\b

It needs improvements, though, for example if non-ASCII letters should be matched, and there are some possible performance optimizations that depend on the exact regex flavor being used.

See it on regex101.

For Ruby 2, I would suggest /(?=\p{L})(?:\.[\p{L}-]++|[\p{L} -]+)+\b/

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Here is a solution in Perl:

 $ cat tmp
 Topic one ......... 30 Second Topic .......... 33 Third one ......... 3   Topic.with.dots ..........   33 One more line ......................... 27 last topic ...... 34


$ cat tmp  | perl -ne 'while (m/((?:\w|[. ])+?) [.]+ \d+/g) { print "$1\n" }' 
Topic one
Second Topic
Third one
 Topic.with.dots
One more line
last topic

A little explanation of what I am doing here, the inner set of parens (?:...) are non capturing, so they are only for grouping, and they group a word-char (\w) or a space or dot [. ] and then, since you have more dots, the match is non-greedy +? and the whole match goes into $1, which is printed.

HTH

--EDIT--

Ruby has almost all constructs of Perl, including regex, and it is a straight forward conversion! (not sure why it had to be voted down!) FWIW, here it is in Ruby:

while ARGF.gets
  puts $_.scan(/((?:\w|[. ])+?) [.]+ \d+/)
end
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1  
While that works, the OP requested a Ruby solution. –  the Tin Man Jul 12 '13 at 8:30
    
@theTinMan Come on, a regex is a regex. It's usually not a big problem to use a regex from one language in another. –  rednaw Jul 12 '13 at 8:35
    
Onigmo is only a subset of PCRE. –  sawa Jul 12 '13 at 9:00

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