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I try to understand c++ numerical properties. Thus, I am interested by the Underflow phenomenon. Can anyone give me an example of an Underflow and the way to handle it?

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1  
0U-1. By putting a UB tag, though, I assume you mean signed underflow. –  chris Jul 12 '13 at 8:15
    
@chris (let's assume 32-bit unsigned for the sake of argument) technically, there's no under/overflow there: the result of 0U-1 is 4294967295, not -1. 4294967295 fits in a 32-bit unsigned int and therefore doesn't overflow. By contrast, the result of -2147483648-1 is -2147483649 which doesn't fit on a signed 32-bit int and therefore overflows/underflows. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 12 '13 at 8:33
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes, I knew I should have typed out those extra characters, even if I got lazy and just used INT_MIN. Either way would probably be less than the note I had to tag on, too. That's kind of depressing. –  chris Jul 12 '13 at 8:38
    
The use of “numerical” makes me think the question is about floating-point underflow, which is not undefined behavior (inasmuch as the compiler chooses to provide IEEE 754 floating-point semantics). –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 12 '13 at 9:08
    
@PascalCuoq it is about doubles underflow –  WildThing Jul 12 '13 at 9:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An example of floating-point underflow is:

double d = DBL_MIN / 3.0;

A conforming IEEE 754 implementation should set d to a “subnormal”, that is, a number that is so close to zero that precision is reduced. You will find plenty of information on Wikipedia.

Some implementations may “Flush to Zero”. The consequence in the example above is to set d to zero.

An underflow is the result of larger negative exponents not being available to represent the number. It is sometimes possible to avoid them by “normalizing” the computation, which amounts to somehow computing on x1*2N, x2*2N, … instead of x1, x2, … for an N of your choice.

Floating-point underflow is not undefined behavior. You can, if you wish, use “FPU exceptions” to detect it either by polling or by receiving SIGFPE. Note that “FPU exceptions” have nothing in common with C++ exceptions except the name.

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are there any other operations that may cause underflow? –  WildThing Jul 12 '13 at 9:28
1  
@WildThing All five basic IEEE 754 operations except sqrt (that is, +, -, *, /) can cause underflow. They cause underflow each time the mathematical result would be between -DBL_MIN*(1-DBL_EPSILON/4) and DBL_MIN*(1-DBL_EPSILON/4) (give or take a fraction of an ULP). –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 12 '13 at 9:30
1  
@WildThing For sane implementations of these function, the rule “They cause underflow each time the mathematical result would be between …” applies. The sine of a subnormal is a subnormal, for instance. The nature of floating-point (very probably) means that there are no normal doubles x such that sin(x) or cos(x) is a subnormal, but this is assuming a sane implementation. –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 12 '13 at 9:36
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FPU exception have nothing in common with C++ exception: but it seems we can connect them on some OS stackoverflow.com/questions/2769814/… (I did not try though) –  aka.nice Jul 12 '13 at 10:01
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Although DBL_MIN/2 underflows, this underflow is dismissed (is not flagged and effectively never exists) if default underflow handling is enabled, because the result is exact. In the default mode, exact results never underflow. In contrast, DBL_MIN/3 or DBL_MIN/(2./3) would always raise the underflow flag. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 12 '13 at 10:30

Example of integer underflow:

int foo(int x)
{
    return x - 1;  // underflow if x is INT_MIN
}

If foo is called with argument value INT_MIN, there is an underflow and the program invokes undefined behavior in this case.

If INT_MIN is the in range of acceptable values for function foo, prevent the underflow this way:

int foo(int x)
{
    if (x == INT_MIN)
    {
        // handle error case
        // for example, return x
    }

    return x - 1;  // underflow if x is INT_MIN
}
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what about using doubles? –  WildThing Jul 12 '13 at 8:57
    
@WildThing if the range of int is not sufficient for your operations, you should look at the range of the other integer types like unsigned int, long, etc. –  ouah Jul 12 '13 at 9:00
    
I am talking about underflow that can happen when one use doubles –  WildThing Jul 12 '13 at 9:05
int main()
{
        short int x ;

        for(x=0;;x++)
        {
                printf("%d \n",x);

                if(x < 0)
                  break;
        }
}

o/p

---
---
--
32761
32762
32763
32764
32765
32766
32767
-32768

Assuming you are asking the underflow concept in signed no. Here the concept is the signed no is works like a circle once you reached the half of the circle it will go in -ve half of that circle and it will continue and never ends. it start for 0-32767 (+ve) -32768 to -1 (-ve) half.

This is the responsibility of programmer to handle this situation.Compiler won't raise any error if you underflow.

Hope this helps.

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2  
"Here the concept is the signed no is works like a circle once you reached the half of the circle it will go in -ve half of that circle and it will continue and never ends." Not really, no. Usually if the result of an operation cannot be represented in the given type (like in your example, the number 32768 on a 16-bit signed integer) the behaviour is undefined. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 12 '13 at 8:38
    
And being UB, the compiler could raise an error if it wanted to. –  chris Jul 12 '13 at 8:41
    
What about using double values? –  WildThing Jul 12 '13 at 8:58
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes, Mysticial's question is the only thing I ever think about when saying it matters :) And I might have taken "says nothing" a bit too literally, but If during the evaluation of an expression, the result is not mathematically defined or not in the range of representable values for its type, the behavior is undefined. –  chris Jul 12 '13 at 9:07
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes The program in the question does not invoke undefined behavior on most compilation platforms because x++ is evaluated as x = (short)((int)x + 1);. It only invokes implementation-defined behavior in the conversion to short. See the quiz part of blog.frama-c.com/index.php?post/2013/07/11/… –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 12 '13 at 9:26

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