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I would like to have some clarifications about the way Fortran handles "empty" characters in strings. Let us assume we have this situation:

program main
implicit none

test('AB')
end program

where

function test(name)
implicit none
character(10) :: name
character(3)  :: cutname

write(*,*) '-'//name//'-'             ! Gives output "-AB        -" 
                                      ! Space has then been added at the end
cutname(1:3) = name(1:3)
write(*,*) '1-'//cutname//'-'           ! Gives output "-AB -"
                                        ! It seems there is a space then at the end
                                        ! of cutname

write(*,*)  (cutname(1:2) == 'AB')      ! Gives output  T (true)
write(*,*)  (cutname(3:3) == ' ')       ! Gives output  F (false)
write(*,*)  (cutname  == 'AB ')         ! Gives output  F (false)

end function

I am pretty curious about what is happening in this case. Thanks in advance.

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I've downvoted this question because the code posted does not compile. I think that even Fortran is allowed to exhibit unexpected behaviour in code which does not execute. –  High Performance Mark Jul 12 '13 at 8:55
    
If you do '-'//TRIM(name)//'-' you will get the results you want. TRIM removes extra whitespace from a character array. –  SethMMorton Jul 12 '13 at 16:37
    
@HighPerformanceMark , I supposed to give an example to explain the problem without showing all the code. My CODE does not complain about the "inconsistency" between the character length, with the weird consequences I just wrote about. I spent almost 4 hours trying to understand why, but I wasn't able to figured it out. –  Rauno C. Jul 12 '13 at 18:49
    
@SethMMorton Seth, something strange was happening in my case. Even I was trimming the "name" I was getting F answers to the tests below. That is, it was like the "trailing spaces added to "name" to have consistent character length (10) were printed as white spaces, but were not recognized as empty. Anyway, let me do some more checks. –  Rauno C. Jul 12 '13 at 18:50
    
I should have been clear... '-'//TRIM(name)//'-' would give the string '-AB-......' (dots are spaces for clarity). If you want to do a comparison to the string, you would then need to do (for example) TRIM(cutname) == 'AB'. This will trim the extra whitespace of cutname before comparing to 'AB'. If your character array is 10 characters long, and you only have two characters in it, you will always have 8 spaces at the end. You need to use TRIM or the slice notation everytime to get rid of those, or make cutname only two characters long when you define it. –  SethMMorton Jul 12 '13 at 18:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Standard strings in Fortran are fixed length. If you don't use the entire string, they are padded on the end with blanks/spaces.

I altered your example program to pass compiler checks of gfortran and ifort. Your function had no return, so better as a subroutine. The compilers noticed the inconsistency between the lengths of the actual and dummy argument -- because I put the procedure into a module and useed it so that the compiler could check argument consistency. They complain about passing a length 2 string to a length 10 string. How are the remaining characters supposed to be defined?

module test_mod

contains

subroutine test(name)
implicit none
character(10) :: name
character(3)  :: cutname

write(*,*) '-'//name//'-'             ! Gives output "-AB        -"
                                      ! Space has then been added at the end
cutname(1:3) = name(1:3)
write(*,*) '1-'//cutname//'-'           ! Gives output "-AB -"
                                        ! It seems there is a space then at the end
                                        ! of cutname

write(*,*)  (cutname(1:2) == 'AB')      ! Gives output  T (true)
write(*,*)  (cutname(3:3) == ' ')       ! Gives output  F (false)
write(*,*)  (cutname  == 'AB ')         ! Gives output  F (false)

end subroutine test

end module test_mod



program main
use test_mod
implicit none

call test('AB          ')
end program

When I run this version, the outputs are T, T and T, which is what I expect.

EDIT: I suggest using full warning and error checking options of your compiler. That is how I quickly found the issues with the example. With gfortran: -O2 -fimplicit-none -Wall -Wline-truncation -Wcharacter-truncation -Wsurprising -Waliasing -Wimplicit-interface -Wunused-parameter -fwhole-file -fcheck=all -std=f2008 -pedantic -fbacktrace.

A string assignment statement doesn't require the two sides to have the same lengths. If the RHS is shorter than the string variable on the LHS, it will get padded on the end with blanks. Here, the arguments should be consistent, including in length.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with this answer. When minimal changes are made to make OP's code compile and execute the comparisons return T,T,T. In this, and its other outputs, the corrected program behaves as expected. –  High Performance Mark Jul 12 '13 at 8:51
    
Thanks for the answer. Actually the compiler I am using (gfortran in MinGW_w64 , default level) is not complaining (my example is a little bit more complicated, but the "kernel" of the probem is exactly the one showed in your post). My subroutine is inside a module (which I call in the main). When I call the subroutine from the main, using a differnt number of character, I don't get the True True True answer. –  Rauno C. Jul 12 '13 at 8:57
    
@RaunoC.: You could always define character(len=*) :: name and then character(len=len(name)) :: cutname in the subroutine and not really worry about inconsistent character lengths –  Kyle Kanos Jul 12 '13 at 13:50
    
Thank you @KyleKanos , this is a nice solution I was not thinking about since I was stuck to understand the weird behavior :-) –  Rauno C. Jul 12 '13 at 18:51
    
Yes, after some hours spent trying to understand the weird behavior, I definitely want the debugger to take care of that. As you said, "If the RHS is shorter than the string variable on the LHS, it will get padded on the end with blanks." However, in my case those blank spaces weren't recognized as blank ones. ( write(,) name(4) == ' ' gives F ) –  Rauno C. Jul 12 '13 at 19:01

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