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I write some header file. I want separately declare the namespaces hierarchy (for clarity), and and then declare functions and classes. For me it looks as a table of contents in the document. It would be very convenient for me: to see the full hierarchy of namespaces in one place. I write this:

// Namespaces hierarchy:
namespace Bushman{
    namespace CAD_Calligraphy{}
    //...
}

// Declarations of classes and functions
class Bushman::CAD_Calligraphy::Shp_ostream{
public:
    explicit Shp_ostream(std::ostream& ost);
};

But MS Visual Studio shouts on such way of creation of the header file. I should write so:

namespace Bushman{
    namespace CAD_Calligraphy{
        class Shp_istream{
        public:
            explicit Shp_istream(std::istream& ist);
        };
    }
}

Why the first variant doesn't work? Is this restriction of the C++, or IDE?

P.S. My additional question is here.

Thank you.

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1  
AFAIK, it is C++ restriction - I haven't ever seen "1st variant" in real code. –  SigTerm Jul 12 '13 at 8:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The restriction is in §9/1: "If a class-head-name contains a nested-name-specifier, the class-specifier shall refer to a class that was previously declared directly in the class or namespace to which the nested-name-specifier refers[...]". In other words, the first appearance of the class name cannot be in something like Bushman::CAD_Calligraphy::Shp_ostream.

What you can do is add forward declarations in your initial declaration of the hierarchy:

// Namespaces hierarchy:
namespace Bushman{
    namespace CAD_Calligraphy{
        class Shp_ostream;
        //...
    }
    //...
}

// Declarations of classes and functions
class Bushman::CAD_Calligraphy::Shp_ostream{
public:
    explicit Shp_ostream(std::ostream& ost);
};

Depending on how your headers are organized, this might even be better from the human point of view: your header starts with a sort of index of what is defined in it.

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To quote the standard: Section 7.3.1.2 point 2:

Members of a named namespace can also be defined outside that namespace by explicit qualification (3.4.3.2) of the name being defined, provided that the entity being defined was already declared in the namespace and the definition appears after the point of declaration in a namespace that encloses the declaration’s namespace.

namespace Q {
  namespace V
    void f();
  }
  void V::f() { /∗ ... ∗/ }    // ok. 
  void V::g() { /∗ ... ∗/ }    // Error: g() is not yet a member of V
  namespace V
    void g();
  }
}

namespace R {
   void Q::V::g() { /∗ ... ∗/ }   // // error: R doesn’t enclose Q
}

So, you could do what you have in your original post, if you declare the class name there:

namespace Bushman{
    namespace CAD_Calligraphy {
        class Shp_ostream;
        ...
    }
}
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That's how C++ works.

It's consistent with other nested declarations: you can't add members to a class from outside the class:

class A
{
};

void A::f() { }  // Error!

And you can't add enumerators to an enum from outside:

enum E { E1 = 1, E2 = 2 };

E::E3 = 3;  // Error!

You need to "open" the scope and declare the entity inside the scope. Once it's declared you can define it outside that scope, using a nested-name:

class A
{
  void f();  // declare
};

void A::f() { }  // define
share|improve this answer

First of all, C++ is not designed to work like that. So it is not a surprise that this is happening.

But, since you're using Visual Studio, you could take advantage of partial classes. Unfortunately, it seems this characteristic is only related to C++/CX so maybe yo won't be able to use it.

You will still need to declare a partial class in your namespace hierarchy, but I guess it could be empty.

To be honest, I haven't used this feature and I don't know how far can it be bent in order to achieve what you want. But you could anyway give it a try.

Remember that this is a Visual Studio extension, so your code won't be cross-platform.

Hope this helps. Somehow.

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2  
The link points to a C# feature. –  dyp Jul 12 '13 at 9:06
2  
It's not a question of "designed to work like that", but rather an arbitrary restriction in the standard. (For some meaning of "arbitrary". Presumably when it was introduced, someone had a reason for it.) –  James Kanze Jul 12 '13 at 9:08
    
Sorry, changed the link. Thanks for the heads up, @DyP. Anyway, the possibility of creating partial classes seems highly related to C++/CX, so maybe is not possible for the OP to use it. –  Baltasarq Jul 12 '13 at 19:42
    
@James Kanze, don't understand your comment. The namespace mechanism in C++ was designed to behave in some particular way (you even cite the standard text in your answer), and obviously it does not accept the behaviour the OP would like to have. Another question is whether it could be done/have been done that way or not. –  Baltasarq Jul 12 '13 at 19:50
    
@Baltasarq Not allowing what the OP wants to do is a restriction. It seems arbitrary to me, now, but I assume that at least one committee member felt that there was a good reason for it (and convinced others). –  James Kanze Jul 13 '13 at 17:22

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