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So I just had an interview that I'm confident I screwed up royally. I had a bunch of questions thrown at me and didn't have enough time to answer the last one.

After getting all beginning questions correct, I was asked to write a function that would determine whether a binary tree b is contained within another binary tree a. I coded the question prior to that correctly, in which he asked me to write a function to determine whether two trees are equal:

int sameTree(struct node *a, struct node *b){
//both empty = TRUE
if(a == NULL && b == NULL)
	return TRUE;
//both not empty, compare them
else if(a != NULL && b != NULL){
	return(
	a->data == b->data &&
	sameTree(a->left, b->left) &&
	sameTree(a->right, b->right)
	);
}
//one empty, one not = FALSE
else 
	return FALSE;

}

Ugh. Just for clearing my conscience, again how would you determine whether tree b is inside tree a?

Thanks for any help guys.

share|improve this question
    
Contained AS-IS (same shape), or has all nodes with a different shape (this calls for another algorithm)? BTW, you're missing the part where you search for the root of b in a, but I assume you've left this out because it's obvious. –  Kobi Nov 19 '09 at 5:41
    
Contained as is. –  R.. Nov 19 '09 at 5:48
add comment

3 Answers 3

int in(struct node* outer, struct node* inner){
    if(inner == null){
        return true; // say every tree contains the empty tree
    } else if(outer == null){
        return false;
    } else if(same(outer, inner)){
        return true;
    } else return in(outer->left, inner) || in(outer->right, inner);
}

We must not use the OP's sameTree but rather this function:

int same(struct node* outer, struct node* inner){
    return !inner || outer && outer->data == inner->data && same(outer->left, inner->left) && same(outer->right, inner->right);
}

Or, more verbosely,

int same(struct node* outer, struct node* inner){
    if(inner == null){
        return true;
    } else if(outer == null){
        return false;
    } else if(outer->data == inner->data){
        return same(outer->left, inner->left) && same(outer->right, inner->right);
    } else return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Right. This looks a lot better than mine, but sameTree should also be changed, it will not work sub trees. –  Kobi Nov 19 '09 at 6:06
    
Sorry? The sameTree OP provides looks correct: two null trees are the same, a null tree is not the same as a non-null tree, and two non-null trees are the same if they have the same root-level data and if their children are the same. Am I missing something? –  Wang Nov 19 '09 at 6:16
    
See my example on Amarghosh's answer. this sameTree is correct for equality, but not to check containment. –  Kobi Nov 19 '09 at 6:20
    
Oh, I see now. I did not understand what it mean for a tree to contain another: you mean that the two trees' intersection is equal to the inner tree, whereas I was additionally requiring that subtracting the inner from the outer produce a connected graph. That was what you meant by "A still contains B if A has children where B has nodes." I withdraw my answer. –  Wang Nov 19 '09 at 6:33
    
Dont! it's very good. Just add a comment saying sameTree should be changed. –  Kobi Nov 19 '09 at 6:35
show 1 more comment

This assumes you want the same tree with the same structure, contains in a:

For one, if b is null and a isn't, a contains b (you should check that in your last else).
Second, these aren't binary search trees (unsorted), so to check if b is inside a you should also traverse a (assuming you rename the function):

int containsTree(struct node *a, struct node *b){
//both empty = TRUE
if(a == NULL && b == NULL)
        return TRUE;
//both not empty, compare them

else if(a != NULL && b != NULL){
    return(
      // sameTree should be changed to allow nulls, as below
      sameTree(a, b)
      // check recursively
      || containsTree(a->left, b)
      || containsTree(a->right, b)
    );
//one empty, one not = FALSE
else 
    return B == NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
I think you left a trailing && after sameTree(a,b) –  K Prime Nov 19 '09 at 6:04
    
Indeed. Thanks K Prime. –  Kobi Nov 19 '09 at 6:07
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To check if tree A is contained as-is in tree B, find the node C in B such that C.data == A.data. If there is no such node, A is not contained in B. If C exists, check if A and C are equal using a modified sameTree function - one that ignores mismatches between null children of A and non-null children of C (return true if A.left/right is null).

Thanks @Kobi for the correction.

share|improve this answer
    
Not accurate. If A has children where B has nulls, A still contains B. –  Kobi Nov 19 '09 at 6:01
    
His sameTree function is checking for that recursively –  Amarghosh Nov 19 '09 at 6:06
    
No, it does not. What if a has a left child, 2-A-5 , and b doesn't NULL-B-5 ? It will check 2 vs NULL , and return false. –  Kobi Nov 19 '09 at 6:09
    
Ya, you are right - will edit the post to reflect that. (I'm talking about A in B and you are talking about B in A - that confused me for a moment). –  Amarghosh Nov 19 '09 at 6:16
    
While you're at it, in this case there can be many C nodes, but this is a minor comment :) –  Kobi Nov 19 '09 at 6:22
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