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This question is more of a theoretical nature: I have a SQL Server 2008 R2 with one database that has one table. The table consists of three columns, the first of which is a primary key, and there is an index on all three columns.

Let's assume there are 1 million records and I select exactly one record by referring to the primary key in the WHERE clause. The query takes 1 second to complete. If I add another million records how much longer will the query take? I assume that by having an index on the primary key, the primary key being unique for all records and the index structure being a tree, it should be somthing like O(n * log n)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A search on a clustered index for one entry is a B-tree search which is a binary tree search. Doubling the number of records means one more iteration of half splitting.

An index seek is very efficient anyway and the amount of extra CPU and IO to process this is not very much.

The primary key is not always clustered but SQL Server will make it clustered by default. The other 3 indexes have no value here.

In this demo script, 3 page reads are needed for both one and two million rows. The query plans are identical, even when viewed in xml

This shows that the index tree had free space to handle the extra entries and that a single data page was needed: The entire table is not cached.

CREATE TABLE dbo.foo (ID int IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY, Other1 int, Other2 char(10) DEFAULT 'abcdefghij', Other3 varchar(52) DEFAULT 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz');
GO
INSERT dbo.foo (Other1) VALUES (1);
GO
INSERT dbo.foo (Other1) SELECT Other1 FROM dbo.foo;
GO 20
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM dbo.foo;
GO

-- now enable viewing of execution plans

SELECT * FROM dbo.foo WHERE id = 456789
-- Table 'foo'. Scan count 0, logical reads 3, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
GO
-- double up rows
INSERT dbo.foo (Other1) SELECT Other1 FROM dbo.foo;
GO

SELECT * FROM dbo.foo WHERE id = 456789
-- Table 'foo'. Scan count 0, logical reads 3, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
GO
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you can get some serious trouble if the bigger dataset does not fit into the respective cache at some layer of the cache hierachy –  mnagel Jul 12 '13 at 9:39
    
@mnagel: only the index page and the single data page needs to be in cache. Not the whole table. A clustered index is very small compared to the actual data –  gbn Jul 12 '13 at 9:45
    
@gbn yeah, you are right. but the whole table should be in memory (and not on disk), otherwise the lookup of the actual data will be ms instead if ns even if the index lookup is still fast. –  mnagel Jul 12 '13 at 9:58
    
@RemusRusanu but then again, a binary search tree is like binary search. it's not the same, but it is alike. –  mnagel Jul 12 '13 at 9:59
    
@RemusRusanu: true, I didn't check my terms. –  gbn Jul 12 '13 at 10:06

That depends of size of your primary key - will extra million rows require an additional level in index structure or will fit in existing number of levels.

If it fits, there will be no slowing down in your query.

If extra level is needed, slow down is that search go through extra level, so at most it is % of number of levels - if it is expanded from 3 to 4 - it's 25% at most. But it will not be that much because searching through index structure is just the part of process, and retrieving the actual data at leaf level still takes time.

Bottom up: Difference will likely not exist or should not be noticeable (milliseconds). Selecting a row based on PK (clustered index) should be instant even in table with hundreds of millions of rows. Something is probably very very wrong if it takes a whole second.

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Thanks for your answer. The second was just an assumption not an actual measurement. I'm interested in the scaling of the query runtime in relation to the data volume. –  alexraasch Jul 13 '13 at 16:04

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