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In dll A I have a template singleton:

template <class T>
class Singleton
{
public:
  static T &instance()
  {
    static T _instance;
    return _instance;
  }

private:
  //All constructors are here
};

In Dll B I define a class Logger. Dlls C,D and E use the Logger and it is accessed like this:

Singleton<Logger>::instance();

The problem is that each dll instantiates its own copy of

Singleton<Logger>.

instead of using the same singleton instance. I understand that the solution to this problem is using extern templates. That is dlls C,D and E have to include

extern template class Singleton<Logger>;

and dll B must include:

template class Singleton<Logger>;

This still cause more than one template instance to be created. I tried putting the extern in all the dlls and it still didn't work I tried removing the extern from all the dlls and it still didn't work. Is this not the standard way to implement template singletons? What is the correct way to do this?

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2  
Singletons are evil : c2.com/cgi/wiki?SingletonsAreEvil When mising with dlls, they're worse. When mixing with plugins (dynamically loaded libraries, not from linking), it's even crazier. –  Bruce Jul 18 '13 at 15:51
    
This question is about dlls in one process, not multiple, right? –  Sergei Jul 21 '13 at 12:53
    
Yes that is correct. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 21 '13 at 14:52
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

The trick that works for me is to add __declspec(dllexport) to the singleton's template definition; split the template implementation from the class definition and only include the implementation in the A DLL; and finally, force the template to be instantiated in the A DLL by creating a dummy function that calls Singleton<Logger>::instance().

So in your A DLL's header file, you define the Singleton template like this:

template <class T>
class __declspec(dllexport) Singleton {
public:
  static T &instance();
};

Then in your A DLL's cpp file you define the template implementation, and force an instantiation of Singleton<Logger> like this:

template <class T>
T &Singleton<T>::instance() {
  static T _instance;
  return _instance;
};

void instantiate_logger() {
  Singleton<Logger>::instance();
}

With my compiler at least, I don't need to call instantiate_logger from anywhere. Just having it exist forces the code to be generated. So if you dump the A DLL's export table at this point, you should see an entry for Singleton<Logger>::instance().

Now in your C DLL and D DLL, you can include the header file with the template definition for Singleton, but because there is no template implementation, the compiler won't be able to create any code for that template. This means the linker will end up complaining about unresolved externals for Singleton<Logger>::instance(), but you just have to link in the A DLL's export library to fix that.

The bottom line is that the code for Singleton<Logger>::instance() is only ever implemented in DLL A, so you can never have more than one instance.

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I'll try to see if this works but it sort of defeats the purpose of having Singleton be templated. The point was that you it provides a singleton implementation without having to reimplement it in every singleton class I ever write. If Singleton has to know about Logger than it would have to know about every singleton class I ever write. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 20 '13 at 21:49
    
@BenjyKessler The Singleton doesn't have to know about the Logger - the Logger needs to know about the Singleton. Someone, somewhere needs to force the generation of the Singleton<Logger>::instance implementation - the sensible place for that would be wherever the Logger is implemented (which I thought was DLL A in your case). This would also be the DLL that others would need to link to in order to use the Logger Singleton, so again it would make sense if it is the same DLL that has the Logger implementation. –  James Holderness Jul 20 '13 at 21:59
    
@BenjyKessler My answer would probably have been clearer if I split the Singleton implementation from the instantiate_logger function (I was trying to keep things simple). Typically I would put the Singleton definition in singleton.h and the Singleton implementation in singleton.inl. Then you might have a logger.h including singleton.h, and a logger.cpp including singleton.inl and defining the instantiate_logger function. Anyone wanting to use the Logger singleton would then just include logger.h (which already includes singleton.h). –  James Holderness Jul 20 '13 at 22:11
    
OK, I see, that makes more sense then. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 20 '13 at 22:28
    
This worked for me. I split the singleton.h into singleton.h and singleton.inl, the former of which is included in the exe and dlls and the latter of which is included only where the singleton is actually instantiated (namely, if I have Singleton<MyClass>, I would include singleton.inl in MyClass.cpp and force its instantiation there. –  metal Dec 10 '13 at 16:35
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The "correct" way to do this is...not to use a singleton.

If you want all other code to use the same instance of some type, then give that code a reference to that instance - as a parameter to a function or a constructor.

Using a singleton (non-template) would be exactly the same as using a global variable, a practice you should avoid.

Using a template means the compiler decides how to instantiate the code, and how to access the "instance". The problem you're experiencing is a combination of this and using a static in a DLL.

There are many reasons why singletons are bad, including lifetime issues (when, exactly, would it be safe to delete a singleton?), thread-safety issues, global shared access issues and more.

In summary, if you only want one instance of a thing, only create one instance of it, and pass it around to code that needs it.

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Advice which is correct most of the time until you need a type (not a namespace) which really have one instance because it represents a context resource. Why not a namespace? Because it needs to have explicit construction, explicit destruction, it have a state and it should be accessible from anywhere (thread-safely). Namespaces would be ideal if there was a way to construct/destroy manually all their content. Relying on functions makes this hard to use a system in a specific scope without making mistakes. Adding a handle handle type to call the namespace functions makes using a type simpler. –  Klaim Oct 24 '13 at 14:27
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MSDN says that

Win32 DLLs are mapped into the address space of the calling process. By default, each process using a DLL has its own instance of all the DLLs global and static variables. If your DLL needs to share data with other instances of it loaded by other applications, you can use either of the following approaches:

Create named data sections using the data_seg pragma.

Use memory mapped files. See the Win32 documentation about memory mapped files.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/h90dkhs0%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

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dll A that contains Singleton has only template classes, and therefore isn't really a dll because there is no code that gets compiled. The code only gets compiled when external libraries instantiate Singleton. I don't need to share data I need to share a template instantiation. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 12 '13 at 13:20
3  
Did you read article? Here what I think is going on: you are trying to share Singleton<Logger> instance in different address spaces. When you call Singleton<Logger>::instance() in one DLL it returns reference to local static variable in some address space, when you call Singleton<Logger>::instance() in another DLL it returns reference to local static variable in another address space, so that's why I believe your second dll instantiate another instance of Singleton<Logger>, because it doesn't see previous instance. The question is very interesting, and I haven't ever faced such problem. –  kvv Jul 12 '13 at 13:34
    
Yes. That is exactly my problem. I'm wondering what the solution is. After all what I'm trying to do seems very basic and standard. I read the article and iI'll try to see if it helps. I'm just wary of using such a windows specific solution. There should be something in the language that supports this. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 13 '13 at 19:30
    
So I tried using the data_seg pragma and it didn't help. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 14 '13 at 15:41
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I recommend to combine a refcounted class and an exported api in your Logger class:

class Logger
{
public:
  Logger()
    {
    nRefCount = 1;
    return;
    };

  ~Logger()
    {
    lpPtr = NULL;
    return;
    };

  VOID AddRef()
    {
    InterLockedIncrement(&nRefCount);
    return;
    };

  VOID Release()
    {
    if (InterLockedDecrement(&nRefCount) == 0)
      delete this;
    return;
    };

  static Logger* Get()
    {
    if (lpPtr == NULL)
    {
      //singleton creation lock should be here
      lpPtr = new Logger();
    }
    return lpPtr;
    };

private:
  LONG volatile nRefCount;
  static Logger *lpPtr = NULL;
};

__declspec(dllexport) Logger* GetLogger()
  {
  return Logger::Get();
  };

The code needs some fixing but I try to give you the basic idea.

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You recommend to get rid of Singleton in its entirety? I can't do that. If I could I wouldn't be using templates in the first place and the whole problem wouldn't have occurred. Why should ref counting help? –  Benjy Kessler Jul 15 '13 at 6:41
    
The refcount is to get more control about the life of the logger and the singleton is still there, in the Get() method (I put a comment instead of the singleton code that you have to replace with your own code and the same applies to the lpPtr=NULL when releasing the last instance should be inside a critical section). Basically the code was reformatted to act like a COM object. –  Mauro H. Leggieri Jul 15 '13 at 15:14
    
If you use ref count, make constructor protected to prevent other accidental instanciation and the traditional craziness following (and make destructor protected virtual as well) –  Bruce Jul 18 '13 at 15:48
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Here's a really sketchy solution that you might be able to build from. Multiple templates will be instantiated but they will all share the same instance objects.

Some additional code would be needed to avoid the memory leak (e.g. replace void * with boost::any of shared_ptr or something).

In singleton.h

#if defined(DLL_EXPORTS)
    #define DLL_API __declspec(dllexport)
#else
    #define DLL_API __declspec(dllimport)
#endif

template <class T>
class Singleton
{
public:
  static T &instance()
  {
      T *instance = reinterpret_cast<T *>(details::getInstance(typeid(T)));
      if (instance == NULL)
      {
          instance = new T();
          details::setInstance(typeid(T), instance);
      }

      return *instance;
  }
};

namespace details
{

DLL_API void setInstance(const type_info &type, void *singleton);
DLL_API void *getInstance(const type_info &type);

}

In singleton.cpp.

#include <map>
#include <string>

namespace details
{

namespace
{

std::map<std::string, void *> singletons;

}

void setInstance(const type_info &type, void *singleton)
{
    singletons[type.name()] = singleton;
}

void *getInstance(const type_info &type)
{
    std::map<std::string, void *>::const_iterator iter = singletons.find(type.name());
    if (iter == singletons.end())
        return NULL;

    return iter->second;
}

}

I can't think of a better way right now. The instances have to be stored in a common location.

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I was thinking of giving up and doing this. It's sort of hacky it would be nice if there was a way to actually use a singleton. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 15 '13 at 15:58
1  
Not sure I follow. This will give you singleton objects of type T. I admit I also don't fully understand the need for the Singleton class. That class is not really the singleton. In your getInstance(), you're not instantiating Singleton<T> objects, you're instantiating T objects. The whole class could probably be replaced with a simple non-method getSingleton<T>() function. –  kede Jul 15 '13 at 17:55
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I think your problem in your implementation:

static T _instance;

I assume that static modifier causes compiler to create code in which your T class instances one for each dll. Try different implementations of a singletone. You can try to make static T field in Singletone class. Or maybe Singletone with static pointer inside class should work. I'd recommend you to use second approach, and in your B dll you will specify

Singletone<Logger>::instance = nullptr;

Than on first call for instance() this pointer will be initialized. And I think this will fix your problem.

PS. Don't forget manually handle mutlithreading instancing

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Make some condition like

instance()
{
    if ( _instance == NULL ) {
    _instance = new Singleton();
    }

    return _instance;
}

This will create only single instance and when it got calls for 2nd time it will just return older instance.

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No that's not what happens. There are four different classes instantiated. One for each dll. So each dll will have it's own instance, even with the condition. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 12 '13 at 11:53
    
Plus static does all the work that condition would do, just better (automatic frees, and is threadsafe) –  nijansen Jul 12 '13 at 11:55
3  
Your answer makes no difference to the problem stated by the OP. It just shows a worse implementation for the instance() method. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 12 '13 at 11:58
    
True dat!!!!!!! –  Benjy Kessler Jul 12 '13 at 11:59
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