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I have a similar problem like last time.

This time i have a header file looking like:

>random header 2
>random header name1

and my basefile

>random header name1
wonderfulstringwhatsoevergoeson
>random header 2
someotherline

now the aim is, to have the following output:

someotherline

wonderfulstringwhatsoevergoeson

So i want the line after the match from the basefile. (and only this one, not the header)

Important with this, it shall keep the order of header.

Sort won't work, since it will keep alphabetic order and this just shouldn't happen.

I couldn't figure out, how grep could compare two files and just gives the line after match :/

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you can modify sort. Just use something like sort _sort_function ... take a look here –  user1558455 Jul 12 '13 at 11:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Reads basefile into %h hash, and later follows key order specified in header file,

perl -ne 'BEGIN{ open $F,pop or die $!; %h=<$F> } print $h{$_}' header basefile
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Ah yes, the wonderful clarity of perl syntax :-). –  Ed Morton Jul 12 '13 at 13:40
    
@EdMorton this one looks pretty decent actually :) –  Сухой27 Jul 12 '13 at 13:59

This will do the job for you:

awk 'FNR==NR
    {
        a[$0]=FNR;i=FNR;next
    }
    ($0 in a)
    {
        t=$0;
        getline;b[a[t]]=$0
    }
    END
    {
        for(k=1;k<=i;k++)print b[k]
    }'  head base
share|improve this answer
    
This won't keep the order of header! –  iiSeymour Jul 12 '13 at 12:40
    
Now it works with the order too. –  Vijay Jul 12 '13 at 12:59
    
The BEGIN{i=0} is redundant. –  iiSeymour Jul 12 '13 at 13:03
    
i is redundant, just loop to NR-FNR in the END. If you're considering using getline make sure you read awk.info/?tip/getline and fully understand it and can live with all the caveats. And then don't use it that way. I do like the idea though, +1 for that. –  Ed Morton Jul 12 '13 at 13:06
    
Remember to put your opening curly braces on the same line as the condition - as written every action block will be executed for every line, not just those that match the conditions. –  Ed Morton Jul 12 '13 at 13:26

This should do it:

awk '
   { recs[NR] = $0 }  # store the header lines in 1->(NR-FNR) and the basefile lines in ((NR-FNR)+1)->NR
   END {
       for (hdrNr=1; hdrNr<=(NR-FNR); hdrNr++) {
           hdr = recs[hdrNr]
           for (lineNr=(NR-FNR)+1; lineNr<=NR; lineNr++) {
               line = recs[lineNr]
               if (line == hdr) {
                   print recs[lineNr+1]
               }
           }
       }
   }
' header basefile

Following up on @Vijays idea of just storing the matching lines in an array indexed by the order the headers are read in, here's how you'd do that without getline, without unnecessary variables, with meaningful variable names, and without printing blank lines for every unmatched header:

awk '
    NR==FNR { hdr2nr[$0] = FNR; next }
    hdrNr   { hdrNr2line[hdrNr] = $0 }
    { hdrNr = hdr2nr[$0] }
    END {
        for(hdrNr=1; hdrNr<=(NR-FNR); hdrNr++)
            if (hdrNr in hdrNr2line)
                print hdrNr2line[hdrNr]
    }
'  header basefile

That assumes a given header can only appear once in basefile.

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Try this bash one-liner:

while read line; do match=$(sed -n "/$line/{ n;p}" basefile); echo $match; done < 'header'

This will work, when your basefile always have one line definition for corresponding header.

header:

sat:~# cat header
>random header 2
>random header name1

basefile:

 sat:~# cat basefile 
 >random header name1 
 wonderfulstringwhatsoevergoeson
 >random header 2 
 someotherline

Output:

 sat:~# while read line; do match=$(sed -n "/$line/{ n;p}" basefile);echo $match; done < 'header' 
 someotherline
 wonderfulstringwhatsoevergoeson
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 'N;s/^(.*)\n(.*)/s|^\1$|\2|/' base_file | sed -f - header_file

Turn the base_file into a sed script and run it against the header_file.

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