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Based on an earlier post, I've written the following code. Please excuse the verbosity of this post. I believe it's better for all parties to have the full code available to test and comment on.

program sandbox;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils,
  Generics.Collections;

type
  TDataType = class
    // Stuff common to TInt and TStr
  end;

  TInt = class(TDataType)
    FValue:  integer;
    constructor Create(Value, Low, High: integer);
  end;

  TStr = class(TDataType)
    FValue: string;
    constructor Create(Value: string; Length: integer);
  end;

  TSomeClass = class
    FIntList: TList<TInt>;
    FStrList: TList<TStr>;
    procedure AddToList<T: TDataType>(Element: T);
    constructor Create();
    procedure Free();
  end;

constructor TInt.Create(Value, Low, High: Integer);
begin
  inherited Create();
  FValue := Value;   
end;

constructor TStr.Create(Value: string; Length: Integer);
begin
  inherited Create();
  FValue := Value;
end;

procedure TSomeClass.AddToList<T>(Element: T);
begin
  if TObject(Element) is TInt then
    FIntList.Add(Element)
  else if TObject(Element) is TStr then
    FStrList.Add(Element);
end;

constructor TSomeClass.Create();
begin
  inherited;
  FIntList := TList<TInt>.Create();
  FStrList := TList<TStr>.Create();
end;

procedure TSomeClass.Free();
var
  SomeIntItem: TInt;
  SomeStrItem: TStr;
begin
  for SomeIntItem in FIntList do begin
    SomeIntItem.Free();
  end;

  for SomeStrItem in FStrList do begin
    SomeStrItem.Free;
  end;

  FIntList.Free();
  FStrList.Free();
end;

var
  Inst: TSomeClass;

begin
  try
    { TODO -oUser -cConsole Main : Insert code here }

    Inst := TSomeClass.Create;
    Inst.AddToList(TInt.Create(100, 0, 101));
    Inst.AddToList(TStr.Create('Test', 10));
    Inst.Free;

  except
    on E:Exception do
    Writeln(E.Classname, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
end.

Note that the constructors of TInt and TStr in the real world would utilize the Low, High: integer and Length: integer parameters as well. I'm having an "E2089 Invalid typecast" at if TObject(Element) is TInt then and else if TObject(Element) is TStr then running Delphi 2009. Do anyone know why this happens?

Edit: Please note that TInt and TStr are just two of possibly 10-20 other types; otherwise overloading is the tool for the job. :)

share|improve this question
    
Your declaration and implementation of AddToList differ. I don't know enough about generics but for regular pascal that's wrong. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Nov 19 '09 at 7:48
    
Hi Lieven! I think you're referring to the implementation "procedure TSomeClass.AddToList<T>(Element: T)" in contrast to the signature "procedure AddToList<T: TDataType>(Element: T)"? If so, the response to your comment is that RAD studio don't want the constraint on the actual implementation. –  conciliator Nov 19 '09 at 8:26
    
Ah, I see. At least the most obvious is now out of the way for those not yet into generics. Thanks for clearing it up. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Nov 19 '09 at 8:28
    
Just out of curiosity: what's the point in storing each data type in a separate list? Why not use a TList <TDataType>? Do you really have to treat each data type separately? Can't you extract a common signature and use polymorphism? –  jpfollenius Nov 19 '09 at 8:53
    
Thanks Smasher! Honestly, I didn't even think of that. However, I'm not sure its the way to go in my real code. All the instances of TInt are logically separate from the instances of TStr. So keeping them apart is rather sane... But it is obvious that I've got much to learn about polymorphism. At this point, I'll take a step back and consider other design options. Btw: I still don't understand why the typecast is illegal. –  conciliator Nov 19 '09 at 9:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Rethink your design. You may just use overloading instead of a generic type parameter, like this:

procedure Add (SomeString : TString); overload;
procedure Add (SomeInt : TInt); overload;

Or if you want to use polymorphism do what Gamecat suggested and just pass the base type as the parameter, using is on that parameter:

procedure Add (Element : TDataType);

Like Rob pointed out in a comment to your previous question: it's not really generic if you allow only two types and have conditionals based on the actual type. So generics might be the wrong tool here.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Its no compiler bug. Its missing a typecast ;-). But I agree with the wrong tool comment. –  Toon Krijthe Nov 19 '09 at 8:18
    
I misread the question. I have updated my answer. –  jpfollenius Nov 19 '09 at 8:25
    
Thanks Smasher! I realize I should've pointed out from the outset that TInt and TStr will be accompanied by more than 10 other types as well. I was unaware of the TypeInfo() method, so +1 for that! :) –  conciliator Nov 19 '09 at 8:42
    
You mean the one that I just deleted? :) Here's the link to Barry Kelly's original answer in case anyone wonders: stackoverflow.com/questions/805931/… –  jpfollenius Nov 19 '09 at 8:51
2  
@conciliator: Even if you have 10+ different types, if you want to put them in 10+ different lists generics are not the way to go, and overloaded methods are better (+1 to this answer). And in any case, if you are relatively new to Delphi I'd strongly advise to stay away from generics unless there is a really compelling case for them - at least with Delphi 2009 we developers have been treated as a giant field test of this new feature, and you never really know whether you have f*ed up or the compiler is to blame when things don't work. –  mghie Nov 19 '09 at 10:20

The problem is not with the generics. You add a TDataType to a list that expects TInt or TStr:

procedure TSomeClass.AddToList<T>(Element: T);
begin
  if TObject(Element) is TInt then
    FIntList.Add(TInt(Element))
  else if TObject(Element) is TStr then
    FStrList.Add(TStr(Element));
end;

Solves the problem.

But why not use:

procedure TSomeClass.AddToList(Element: TDataType);
begin
  if Element is TInt then
    FIntList.Add(TInt(Element))
  else if Element is TStr then
    FStrList.Add(TStr(Element));
end;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 you obviously read the question better than I did. –  jpfollenius Nov 19 '09 at 8:21
    
Thanks, Gamecat! The last example compiles nicely. However, I still get a typecast error using your first example (tried T: TDataType, T: class and empty constraints). Did you get it to compile? –  conciliator Nov 19 '09 at 8:40
    
@Gamecat: perhaps I wasn't clear in the first place? It is the typecast in the statement "if TObject(Element) is TInt then" and "else if TObject(Element) is TStr then" that fails... Do you know why? –  conciliator Nov 19 '09 at 9:46
    
I just tested your code. The TObject(Element)cast works just fine, while the FIntList.Add (Element) yields a "invalid type: T and TInt" error message - as Gamecat said. –  jpfollenius Nov 19 '09 at 10:01
    
That's weird. I've uploaded a screen dump: img12.imageshack.us/img12/1208/typecasterror.png . What am I doing wrong? –  conciliator Nov 19 '09 at 10:32

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