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The following query is used to do a member search, in this example, only using the last name. The query returns in a few seconds if searching on a full matching name; but if :LastName = 'S', then the query takes upwards of 12 seconds to return.

How can I speed up this query? If I can do it in under a second with two queries, shouldn't I be able to make it just one query, just as fast? Because of plugins and other methods, it would be easiest for me to have this be one query, hence my question.

The Member table holds every member we've ever had. The table has some members who we don't have any registration for, so they only exist in this table, not in Registration or Registration_History. Registration_History has extra information on most members that I want to display. Registration has most of the same information as RH (RH has some fields that Reg doesnt), but sometimes it has members that RH does not have, which is why it is joined here. EDIT: Members can have multiple rows in Registration. I want to fill the columns from Registration_History, however, some legacy members ONLY exist in Registration. Unlike other members,these legacy members only ever have 1 row in Registration, so I don't need to worry about how Registration is sorted, just that it only grabs 1 row from there.

SQL Fiddle with sample database design

MemberID is indexed in all 3 tables. Before I put the SELECT RHSubSelect.rehiId subquery in, this query was taking almost a full minute to return.

If I split the query into 2 queries, doing this:

SELECT
    MemberID
FROM
    Member
WHERE 
    Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%')

And then putting those MemberIDs into an array and passing that array to RHSubSelect.MemberID IN ($theArray) (instead of the Member subquery), the results come back very quickly (about a second).

Full query: (Full SELECT statement is in the Fiddle, SELECT * for brevity)

SELECT
    *
FROM
 Member
    LEFT JOIN
        Registration_History FORCE INDEX (PRIMARY)
            ON
                Registration_History.rehiId = (
                                                SELECT
                                                    RHSubSelect.rehiId
                                                FROM
                                                    Registration_History AS RHSubSelect
                                                WHERE
                                                    RHSubSelect.MemberID IN (
                                                                                SELECT
                                                                                    Member.MemberID
                                                                                FROM
                                                                                    Member
                                                                                WHERE 
                                                                                    Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%')
                                                                            )                                                                   
                                                ORDER BY 
                                                    RHSubSelect.EffectiveDate DESC
                                                LIMIT 0, 1
                                            )                                   
    LEFT JOIN
        Registration FORCE INDEX(MemberID)
            ON
                Registration.MemberID = Member.MemberID
WHERE 
    Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%') 
GROUP BY
    Member.MemberID
ORDER BY 
    Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName asc 
LIMIT 0, 1000

MySQL Explain, with the FORCE INDEX() in the query: "Mysql Explain"

(If the image with the explain doesn't show, it's also here: http://oi41.tinypic.com/2iw4t8l.jpg)

share|improve this question
    
The question is incomplete ... the part after "...FORCE_INDEX()..." is missing. – DaDaDom Jul 12 '13 at 12:46
    
@DaDaDom After the "MySQL Explain, with the FORCE INDEX() in the query:" line? There should be a picture showing the EXPLAIN. I uploaded it via SO, but here is a tinypic of it: i41.tinypic.com/2iw4t8l.png – John Jul 12 '13 at 12:49
    
Ah, sorry, the images are blocked here at the company's proxy ... – DaDaDom Jul 12 '13 at 12:57
    
Have you tried adding an index on Member.Lastname? – DaDaDom Jul 12 '13 at 13:03
    
@DaDaDom An index on Member.LastName already exists – John Jul 12 '13 at 13:05

My suggestion would be a query like this:

SELECT *
FROM Member
LEFT JOIN Registration USING (MemberID)
LEFT JOIN Registration_History ON rehiID = (
  SELECT rehiID
  FROM Registration_History AS RHSubSelect
  WHERE RHSubSelect.MemberID = Member.MemberID
  ORDER BY EffectiveDate DESC
  LIMIT 1
)
WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%')

The way it works, is you start by selecting from the Member table matching against the LastName. You then have simple LEFT JOIN to the Registration table, since a particular member can have at most 1 entry in that table. Finally you LEFT JOIN the Registration_History table with a subselect.

The subselect looks for the most recent EffectiveDate matching the current MemberID and returns the rehiID for that record. The LEFT JOIN must then match that rehiID exacty. If there are no entries in the Registration_History for that member, then nothing is joined.

In theory this should be relatively fast, since you are only performing the LIKE comparison in the main query. The Registration join should be fast since the table is indexed on MemberID. However, I suspect you'll need an additional index on the Registration_History to get the best performance.

You've already got the primary key, rehID, indexed which is what we need for the LEFT JOIN on rehID. However, the subquery needs to match the MemberID in the WHERE clause as well as sorting by the EffectiveDate. For the best performance there, I think you'll need an additional index combining the MemberID and EffectiveDate columns.

Note that my example query is just the bare minimum to keep things simple. You'll obviously need to replace the * with all the fields you want returned (the same as your original query). Also you'll need to add your ORDER BY and LIMIT clauses. However, the GROUP BY should not be required.

SQL Fiddle link: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/4a947a/1

The above fiddle show the full query except it has the last name hardcoded. I've modified your original sample data to include a couple more records and changed some of the values. I also added the extra index on the Registration_History table.

Optimising for the LIMIT

If you're going to doing timing runs again, I'd be curious to see how my query performs when using the modification suggested by Kickstart to do a subselect against the Member table first, before joining the Registration and Registration_History tables.

SELECT
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.RegYear, ''), NULLIF(Registration.Year, '')) AS RegYear,
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Registration.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Member.MemberID, '')) AS RegNumber,
    Member.MemberID,
    Member.LastName,
    Member.FirstName,
    Member.Relevance
FROM (
  SELECT MemberID, LastName, FirstName,
    CASE
      WHEN Member.LastNameTrimmed = :LastName THEN 1
      WHEN Member.LastNameTrimmed LIKE CONCAT(:LastName, '%') THEN 2
      ELSE 3
    END AS Relevance 
  FROM Member
  WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%')
  ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName ASC
  LIMIT 0, 1000
) Member
LEFT JOIN Registration USING (MemberID)
LEFT JOIN Registration_History ON rehiID = (
  SELECT rehiID
  FROM Registration_History AS RHSubSelect
  WHERE RHSubSelect.MemberID = Member.MemberID
  ORDER BY EffectiveDate DESC
  LIMIT 1
)

When using a LIMIT, this should perform significantly better than my original query, since it won't have to carry out a bunch of unnecessary joins for the records that are excluded by the LIMIT.

share|improve this answer
    
Whoops - forgot to mention this in my original question. This was the original query I had written, and should've used in my question; it takes ~7 seconds, which is, again, ~6 seconds longer than splitting into 2 queries. Because the "2 query" method is very similar but so much faster, I assumed this was because the LIMIT isn't being applied to the RHSubSelect, so it is grabbing all the MemberIDs that match from Member instead of only 1000. Splitting into 2 queries ensured that only 1000 were being used. – John Jul 16 '13 at 20:17
    
@John Have you tried with the additional index though? – James Holderness Jul 16 '13 at 20:25
    
Whoops, no, I'll add that now. Will take some time. – John Jul 16 '13 at 20:28
    
Wow, that did it. I had to do an Index of type INDEX, not UNIQUE, due to some data issues, but I may be able to correct those and make it unique in the future. It runs at least under 1.5 seconds, which is probably the best I can hope for here. Now, the regular left join on Registration was selecting a member multiple times, so I did a sub select on that too with very minimal running time change. – John Jul 16 '13 at 21:05
1  
As an aside, testing your query against some test data I knocked up it takes about .66 seconds. My query takes about 0.4 seconds. Modifying yours to do a sub select against members (ie, like my query), sorting out the 1000 required records first reduces the time down to about 0.4. – Kickstart Jul 22 '13 at 14:08

The main thing you seem to be checking is the last name with a leading % in the like. This renders the index on that column useless, and your SQL is searching for it twice.

I am not 100% sure what you are trying to do. Your SQL appears to get all the members who match on name to the one required, then get the last registration_history record for those. The one you get could be from any one of the matching members, which seems strange unless you only ever expect to get a single member.

If this is the case the following minor tidy (removing and IN and changing it to a JOIN) up will possibly slightly improve things.

SELECT
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.RegYear, ''), NULLIF(Registration.Year, '')) AS RegYear,
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Registration.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Member.MemberID, '')) AS RegNumber,
    Member.MemberID,
    Member.LastName,
    Member.FirstName,
    CASE
        WHEN Member.LastNameTrimmed = :LastName
        THEN 1
        WHEN Member.LastNameTrimmed LIKE CONCAT(:LastName, '%')
        THEN 2
        ELSE 3
    END AS Relevance 
    FROM Member
    LEFT JOIN Registration_History FORCE INDEX (PRIMARY)
    ON Registration_History.rehiId = 
    (
        SELECT RHSubSelect.rehiId
        FROM Registration_History AS RHSubSelect
        INNER JOIN Member 
        ON RHSubSelect.MemberID = Member.MemberID
        WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%')
        ORDER BY RHSubSelect.EffectiveDate DESC
        LIMIT 0, 1
    )                                   
    LEFT JOIN Registration FORCE INDEX(MemberID)
    ON  Registration.MemberID = Member.MemberID
    WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%') 
    GROUP BY Member.MemberID
    ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName asc 
    LIMIT 0, 1000

However if this is not quite what you want then further changes might be possible.

Bit more of a clean up, eliminating one of the LIKEs with a leading wildcard:-

SELECT
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Sub2.RegYear, ''), NULLIF(Registration.Year, '')) AS RegYear,
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Sub2.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Registration.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Member.MemberID, '')) AS RegNumber,
    Member.MemberID,
    Member.LastName,
    Member.FirstName,
    CASE
        WHEN Member.LastNameTrimmed = :LastName
        THEN 1
        WHEN Member.LastNameTrimmed LIKE CONCAT(:LastName, '%')
        THEN 2
        ELSE 3
    END AS Relevance 
FROM Member
LEFT OUTER JOIN Registration 
ON  Registration.MemberID = Member.MemberID
LEFT OUTER JOIN
(
    SELECT Registration_History.MemberID, Registration_History.rehiID, Registration_History.RegYear, Registration_History.RegNumber
    FROM Registration_History
    INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT RHSubSelect.MemberID, MAX(RHSubSelect.EffectiveDate) AS EffectiveDate
        FROM Registration_History AS RHSubSelect
        GROUP BY RHSubSelect.MemberID
    ) Sub1
    ON Registration_History.MemberID = Sub1.MemberID AND Registration_History.EffectiveDate = Sub1.EffectiveDate
) Sub2
ON  Sub2.MemberID = Member.MemberID
WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%') 
GROUP BY Member.MemberID
ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName asc 
LIMIT 0, 1000

This is getting all the members with a matching name, their matching registration record and their registration_history record with the latest EffectiveDate.

I do not think the last GROUP BY is necessary (assuming that there is a 1 to 1 relationship between Members and Registration, and if not you probably want to use something other than GROUP BY), but I have left it in for now.

Afraid without table declares and some same data I can't really test it.

EDIT - Bit of a play, trying to reduce the quantities it is dealing with earlier in the select:-

SELECT
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.RegYear, ''), NULLIF(Sub1.Year, '')) AS RegYear,
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Sub1.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Sub1.MemberID, '')) AS RegNumber,
    Sub1.MemberID,
    Sub1.LastName,
    Sub1.FirstName,
    CASE
        WHEN Sub1.LastName = :LastName
        THEN 1
        WHEN Sub1.LastName LIKE CONCAT(:LastName, '%')
        THEN 2
        ELSE 3
    END AS Relevance 
FROM
(
    SELECT 
        Member.MemberID,
        Member.LastName,
        Member.FirstName,
        Registration.Year,
        Registration.RegNumber,
        MAX(Registration_History.EffectiveDate) AS EffectiveDate
    FROM Member
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Registration 
    ON  Registration.MemberID = Member.MemberID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Registration_History 
    ON Registration_History.MemberID = Member.MemberID
    WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%') 
    GROUP BY Member.MemberID,
        Member.LastName,
        Member.FirstName,
        Registration.Year,
        Registration.RegNumber
) Sub1
LEFT OUTER JOIN Registration_History
ON Registration_History.MemberID = Sub1.MemberID AND Registration_History.EffectiveDate = Sub1.EffectiveDate
ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName asc 
LIMIT 0, 1000

EDIT again.

Give this a try. The items you are sorting on are all from the members table so possibly makes sense to exclude the as early as possible in a subselect.

SELECT
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History2.EffectiveDate, ''), NULLIF(Registration2.Year, '')) AS RegYear,
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History2.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Registration2.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Member.MemberID, '')) AS RegNumber,
    Member.MemberID,
    Member.LastName,
    Member.FirstName,
    Member.Relevance 
    FROM
    (
        SELECT Member.MemberID,
                Member.LastName,
                Member.FirstName,
                CASE
                    WHEN Member.LastName = :LastName
                    THEN 1
                    WHEN Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT(:LastName, '%')
                    THEN 2
                    ELSE 3
                END AS Relevance 
        FROM Member
        WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%')
        ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName asc 
        LIMIT 0, 1000
    ) Member
    LEFT OUTER JOIN 
    (
        SELECT MemberID, MAX(EffectiveDate) AS EffectiveDate
        FROM Registration_History 
        GROUP BY MemberID
    ) Registration_History
    ON Registration_History.MemberID = Member.MemberID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Registration_History Registration_History2
    ON Registration_History2.MemberID = Registration_History.MemberID
    AND Registration_History2.EffectiveDate = Registration_History.EffectiveDate
    LEFT OUTER JOIN 
    (
        SELECT MemberID, MAX(Year) AS Year
        FROM Registration 
        GROUP BY MemberID
    ) Registration
    ON Registration.MemberID = Member.MemberID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN 
    (
        SELECT MemberID, Year, MAX(RegNumber) AS RegNumber
        FROM Registration 
        GROUP BY MemberID, Year
    ) Registration2
    ON Registration2.MemberID = Member.MemberID
    AND Registration2.Year = Registration.Year

EDIT again

Not tested the following so this is more for just an idea of another way to try to get around the issue, using a little trick with GROUP_CONCAT:-

SELECT
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.EffectiveDate, ''), NULLIF(Registration.Year, '')) AS RegYear,
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Registration.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Member.MemberID, '')) AS RegNumber,
    Member.MemberID,
    Member.LastName,
    Member.FirstName,
    Member.Relevance 
    FROM
    (
        SELECT Member.MemberID,
                Member.LastName,
                Member.FirstName,
                CASE
                    WHEN Member.LastName = :LastName
                    THEN 1
                    WHEN Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT(:LastName, '%')
                    THEN 2
                    ELSE 3
                END AS Relevance 
        FROM Member
        WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%')
        ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName asc 
        LIMIT 0, 1000
    ) Member
    LEFT OUTER JOIN 
    (
        SELECT MemberID, 
                SUBSTRING_INDEX(GROUP_CONCAT(EffectiveDate ORDER BY EffectiveDate DESC), ",", 1) AS EffectiveDate,
                SUBSTRING_INDEX(GROUP_CONCAT(RegNumber ORDER BY EffectiveDate DESC), ",", 1) AS RegNumber
        FROM Registration_History 
        GROUP BY MemberID
    ) Registration_History
    ON Registration_History.MemberID = Member.MemberID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN 
    (
        SELECT MemberID, 
                SUBSTRING_INDEX(GROUP_CONCAT(Year ORDER BY Year DESC), ",", 1) AS Year,
                SUBSTRING_INDEX(GROUP_CONCAT(RegNumber ORDER BY Year DESC), ",", 1) AS RegNumber
        FROM Registration 
        GROUP BY MemberID
    ) Registration
    ON Registration.MemberID = Member.MemberID
share|improve this answer
    
Updated my question with the table explanation: The Member table holds every member we've ever had. The table has some members who we don't have any registration for, so they only exist in this table, not in Registration or Registration_History. Registration_History has extra information on most members that I want to display. Registration has most of the same information as RH (RH has some fields that Reg doesnt), but sometimes it has members that RH does not have, which is why it is joined here. – John Jul 12 '13 at 14:06
    
Does that explanation help? – John Jul 12 '13 at 14:07
    
It does, thank you. I think you do have a logical error in your SQL when more than one person matches :LastName as you will only use the most recent record for any of those people rather than the one that matches the memberid. Give my 2nd suggestion a try. – Kickstart Jul 12 '13 at 14:11
    
Unfortunately, that 2nd suggestion never came back; after two minutes I just killed it. Thanks though! It's very frustrating that it works beautifully as 2 queries, but I just can't get it into 1. – John Jul 12 '13 at 14:23
1  
I'll see what I can put together for you, will be later today though. Thanks! – John Jul 12 '13 at 14:36

Try this query:

set @lastname = 'Smith1';

-- explain extended
SELECT  
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.RegYear, ''), NULLIF(Registration.Year, '')) AS RegYear,
    COALESCE(NULLIF(Registration_History.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Registration.RegNumber, ''), NULLIF(Member.MemberID, '')) AS RegNumber,
    Member.MemberID,
    Member.LastName,
    Member.FirstName,
    CASE
      WHEN Member.LastNameTrimmed = 'Smith' THEN 1
      WHEN Member.LastNameTrimmed LIKE CONCAT(@lastname, '%') THEN 2
      ELSE 3
    END AS Relevance 
FROM (
    SELECT  Member.*,
        ( SELECT RHSubSelect.rehiId
            FROM  Registration_History AS RHSubSelect
            WHERE RHSubSelect.MemberID = Member.MemberID                                         
            ORDER BY RHSubSelect.EffectiveDate DESC
            LIMIT 0,1
         ) rh_MemberId
    FROM Member
    WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', @lastname, '%')
) Member
LEFT JOIN  Registration_History 
    ON Registration_History.rehiId = Member.rh_MemberId
LEFT JOIN Registration -- FORCE INDEX(MemberID)
    ON Registration.MemberID = Member.MemberID
GROUP BY Member.MemberID
ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName asc 
LIMIT 0, 1000
;
share|improve this answer
    
Query took 16 seconds to run. Honestly, I'm not sure how this is written any more efficient than the @James Holderness's or Tomas's answer, you've just sort of re-written organized the way the sub selects are. Can you please provide an explanation? – John Jul 19 '13 at 12:03

Ok, here's my shot and I used a variety of pieces. One, I had to take the "relevance" field from one as you did not indicate how to make it work. Next, since you wanted the latest entry from the registration history for a given member (if they existed in R/H), it appears that the effective date correlated with the ReHiID so I used that as it appears that would be a great key to work on for subsequent left-join.

So, the inner query makes the preliminary pass on just the criteria of the name you are looking for, applies relevance and limits the 1000 entries there. This way it doesn't have to go through 20,000 entries at the outer level and join... just the 1000 that could qualify.

That result is then left-joined to the other tables as indicated... Registration of only a single entry (if exist) and left-joined to the R/H on the member AND the max ReHiID.

To apply the name you are looking for, just change the ( select @LookForMe := 'S' ) sqlvars line in the query...

select *
   from
      ( select
              M.*,
              max( RH.EffectiveDate ) as MaxEffectiveDate,
              max( R.RegNumber ) as MaxRegNumber,
              CASE WHEN M.LastNameTrimmed = @LookForMe THEN 1
              WHEN M.LastNameTrimmed LIKE CONCAT(@LookForMe, '%') THEN 2
              ELSE 3 END AS Relevance 
           from
              ( select @LookForMe := 'S' ) sqlvars,
              Member M
                 LEFT JOIN Registration_History RH
                    on M.MemberID = RH.MemberID
                 LEFT JOIN Registration R
                    on M.MemberID = R.MemberID
           where 
              M.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', 'S', '%')
           group by
              M.MemberID
           order by
              Relevance, 
              M.LastName,
              M.FirstName
           limit
              0,1000 ) PreQuery
      LEFT JOIN Registration R2
         on PreQuery.MemberNumber = R2.MemberNumber
         AND PreQuery.MaxRegNumber = R2.RegNumber
      LEFT JOIN Registration_History RH2
         ON PreQuery.MemberNumber = RH2.MemberNumber
        AND PreQuery.MaxEffectiveDate = RH2.EffectiveDate

Lets see how quick this runs with your production data and how close we get.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response! This consistently took 0.99 seconds. However, This returns multiple rows for each Member; probably because Registration can contain more than one row for each Member. I want just one row per member. However, like the other answers, I'm not really sure how this query is any more efficient than @James Holderness's response. Seems to be the same, if not less efficient. – John Jul 21 '13 at 2:05
    
@John, I added MAX() for the registration too and slightly altered LEFT-joins outside the prequery. I'd like to consider the times of this revision, and if it is consistently faster (at just 1 second) even with the group by, then why would it not be a viable solution. – DRapp Jul 21 '13 at 2:28
    
Well, at the moment it's returning multiple rows for each person. Also, the MAX() won't always select the correct row. It is possible that a MAX(rehiId) won't always have the latest RH.EffectiveDate, which is why the queries require the latest RH.EffectiveDate. – John Jul 21 '13 at 11:48
    
@John, Revised for max effective date and join on both qualifying fields since what should have been a unique ID causing duplicates to occur. – DRapp Jul 21 '13 at 15:17
    
Slower now, at 3 seconds. What's the point of the outer query, when you are just selecting all the information in the inner query? – John Jul 21 '13 at 18:21

If I understood your problem correctly (you just need to select particular users and their latest history record - is that correct)? If yes, your problem is actually very easy variant of greatest record per group problem. No need for any subqueries:

Query #1

SELECT Member.*, rh1.*
FROM Member
LEFT JOIN Registration_History AS rh1 USING (MemberID)
LEFT JOIN Registration_History AS rh2
    ON rh1.MemberId = rh2.MemberId AND rh1.EffectiveDate < rh2.EffectiveDate
WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%') 
    AND rh2.MemberId IS NULL
ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName ASC
LIMIT 0, 1000

Query #3

(#2 was removed, taking #3 here to avoid confusion in comments)

SELECT Member.*, max(rh1.EffectiveDate), rh1.*
FROM Member
LEFT JOIN Registration_History AS rh1 USING (MemberID)
WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%') 
GROUP BY Member.MemberID
ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName ASC
LIMIT 0, 1000

Query #4

This one was inspired by James query, but removing the limit and order by (note that you should have defined index on EffectiveDate for not only this, but all queries to be efficient!)

select *
from Member
left join Registration_History AS rh1 on rh1.MemberID = Member.MemberID
    and rh1.EffectiveDate = (select max(rh2.EffectiveDate)
                             from Registration_History as rh2
                             where rh2.MemberID = Member.MemberID)
                        )
WHERE Member.LastName LIKE CONCAT('%', :LastName, '%') 
ORDER BY Relevance ASC,LastName ASC,FirstName ASC
LIMIT 0, 1000

Please post the actual durations in your db!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response! Query #1 runs in about 0.6 seconds, but returns repeat Member rows, possibly because Registration can contain multiple rows for one member. How would I fix that without doing a subquery or skipping over results when I loop through them? Query #2 runs in ~6.5 seconds, but returns 0 rows when using the set @prev_member line. MySQL adds # MySQL returned an empty result set (i.e. zero rows). to that line after I run the query. Without that line, the query returns in ~4 seconds, but has repeat rows for each member. – John Jul 17 '13 at 21:32
    
Dear @John, well, if the Registration table contains more rows for one member, then yes. But what do you actually want here? 1) Do you want to see fields of Registration table, but which registration for given member? In your query you use group by and * in select, which will produce undefined results for Registration.* fields. 2) Do you only want to filter those members, for which some Registration exists (i.e. not being interested in Registration.* fields themselves). – TMS Jul 18 '13 at 6:07
    
1) I want to fill the columns from Registration_History, however, some legacy members ONLY exist in Registration. Unlike other members,these legacy members only ever have 1 row in Registration, so I don't need to worry about how Registration is sorted, just that it only grabs 1 row from there. After looking at the query more, I've realized that the GROUP BY wasn't doing what I thought it was. The SELECT * is just there for brevity; as I mentioned, the actual SELECT statement is in the SQL fiddle. – John Jul 18 '13 at 11:46
    
2) Take a look at the SQL fiddle - I grab my info from RegHist, grabbing the record for that member with the latest effective date, but if it doesn't exist, then grab it from Reg. I don't think doing a subquery for Reg is going to slow it down at all, it's the RegHist that has been the culprit, I'll try it later this morning. What might seem to be my issue with getting Query #2 to run? I'm inexperienced in using MySQL variables. – John Jul 18 '13 at 11:48
    
Dear @John, your SQL fiddle is doesn't load properly. "some legacy members ONLY exist in Registration" -- so they do not exist in Members table? So the only table that contains all members is Registration, but they can be duplicated? – TMS Jul 18 '13 at 13:45

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