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The system I currently develop on, uses MongoDB 2.4.4

I have a collection of users.

There is a combined index: { "LASTNAME" : 1 , "FIRSTNAME" : 1 , "EMAIL" : 1 , "CITY" : 1 , "STATUS" : 1} I also tried with single indexes, without a performance increase

The system contains 400.000 test records.

The query (Java debug from org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.query.Query):

{ "LASTNAME" : { "$regex" : "^Schm"}},
  Fields: { "FIRSTNAME" : 1 , "EMAIL" : 1 , "CITY" : 1 , "STATUS" : 1 ,"LASTNAME" : 1},
  Sort: { "LASTNAME" : 1 , "FIRSTNAME" : 1 , "EMAIL" : 1 , "CITY" : 1 , "STATUS" : 1}

performs within 16ms.That is fantastic.

This query is not shown in the MongoDB console (no debug information to post here).

But, I like to search not only starts with, it also should be case insensitive.

The query:

{ "LASTNAME" : { "$regex" : "^Schm" , "$options" : "i"}},
  Fields: { "FIRSTNAME" : 1 , "EMAIL" : 1 , "CITY" : 1 , "STATUS" : 1 , "LASTNAME" : 1},
  Sort: { "LASTNAME" : 1 , "FIRSTNAME" : 1 , "EMAIL" : 1 , "CITY" : 1 , "STATUS" : 1}

performs within 897ms. That is unacceptable slow.

Mongo Console shows this:

query: { query: { LASTNAME: /^Schm/i },
  orderby: { LASTNAME: 1, FIRSTNAME: 1, EMAIL: 1, CITY:1, STATUS: 1 }
} cursorid:1252405545564528 ntoreturn:25 ntoskip:0 nscanned:297651
keyUpdates:0 numYields: 1 locks(micros) r:1391715 nreturned:25 reslen:4422 897ms

As one can see. It's not the scanAndOrder problem that points onto index problems.

Then I tried to solve it the next way what fits the most scenarios (inserted from the user, lower case and upper case), but that is slower also. My expectation was, that it performs thrice as long as the first query.

The query:

{ "$or" : [ { "LASTNAME" : { "$regex" : "^Schm"}} , { "LASTNAME" : { "$regex" : "^schm"}} , { "LASTNAME" : { "$regex" : "^SCHM"}}]},
  Fields: { "FIRSTNAME" : 1 , "EMAIL" : 1 , "CITY" : 1 , "STATUS" : 1 , "LASTNAME" : 1},
  Sort: { "LASTNAME" : 1 , "FIRSTNAME" : 1 , "EMAIL" : 1 , "CITY" : 1 , "STATUS" : 1}

performs within 1300ms. Nothing more to say.

MongoDB console:

query: { query: { $or: [ { LASTNAME: /^Schm/ }, { LASTNAME: /^schm/ }, { LASTNAME: /^SCHM/ } ] },
  orderby: { LASTNAME: 1, FIRSTNAME: 1, EMAIL: 1, CITY: 1, STATUS: 1 }
} cursorid:43560166842085 ntoreturn:25 ntoskip:0 nscanned:297651
keyUpdates:0 numYields: 1 locks(micros) r:1531168 nreturned:25 reslen:4422 1300ms

So, how can I search case insensitive that nearly has the speed of the first search? Maximal 150ms!

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As a side note, I have removed the Java tags since this question is only related to Mongo, not Java –  Colin Morelli Jul 12 '13 at 13:22
    
Can you please post the explain() for your $or query –  Colin Morelli Jul 12 '13 at 13:33
    
I don't know how, using Spring MongoTemplate. Currently thinking about switching to mongo-java-driver... –  Nabor Jul 12 '13 at 13:36
    
You would get the explain() from the mongo console, not from Spring –  Colin Morelli Jul 12 '13 at 13:37
    
I now tested it directly on the mongo shell of version 2.4.5. The sort operation makes it so slow (without sort the or statement perfoms in 16ms): -> pastebin.com/Gd0LRPb7 –  Nabor Jul 12 '13 at 14:02
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1 Answer

As soon as you add case insensitivity, you can no longer use an index. This is an important design concern when building an application that needs to have support for searching.

To overcome this, you should store an already-lowercased version of the last name in another field, and query against that case-sensitively (obviously translating all of your search queries to lowercase before passing them to Mongo).

Edit

It looks like text search has been added in 2.4. Read about it here and see if that will do what you need.

As a side note, if you are really concerned with performance (which, judging by your question, it sounds like you might be) you should really reconsider searching against your data storage engine. Consider an alternative search engine such as ElasticSearch (or a simple Lucene index) to keep search traffic off of your primary data store.

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1  
"As soon as you add case insensitivity, you can no longer use an index" <-- +1 for that. It is like people complaining that their SQL query is slow on dates when they use trunc(). –  fge Jul 12 '13 at 13:05
    
But then, why is the or solution so damn slow? –  Nabor Jul 12 '13 at 13:07
    
@Nabor Regardless of why your $or solution is so slow (which, I believe it's because Mongo is falling back to an index scan since you have given it 3 possible "roots" to search from), you should question whether or not it's worth your time anyway. Are you really going to construct an $or query with every valid permutation of casing for each letter in a query, as a way of avoiding a case insensitive search? That won't be any faster. Indexes or not. –  Colin Morelli Jul 12 '13 at 13:16
    
The first line isn't totally true, it is as soon as you loose the prefixed anchor OR use case insensitivity that it cannot use the ability to effectively use an index. Good point the mention still –  Sammaye Jul 12 '13 at 13:16
1  
@ColinMorelli: A full index scan is definitely not using an index effectively, but is generally still better than a table scan of the full documents (which can be significantly worse if you need to page in unused documents to read them!). Indeed you should not be OK with this approach for common queries unless you have a very small data set (or high patience). –  Stennie Jul 20 '13 at 1:56
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