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I need a wait command in Visual Basic that suits me.

I know:

Declare Sub Sleep Lib "kernel32.dll" (ByVal milliseconds As Long)
sleep 5000

But that makes the program unresponsive.

System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(5000) 'The window doesn't load until the timing is over (useless)

My code:

Imports Microsoft.Win32 'To check if is 64Bit or 32Bit

Public Class Loading
  Private Sub Loading_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
    If Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey("Hardware\Description\System\CentralProcessor\0").GetValue("Identifier").ToString.Contains("x86") Then
      My.Settings.Is64 = False
    Else
      My.Settings.Is64 = True
    End If

    'I need command here

    If My.Settings.Is64 = True Then
      Form64.Show()
      Me.Close()
    Else
      MsgBox("No version developed for 32-bit computers.")
      End
    End If
  End Sub
End Class

Errors:

@Idle_Mind

1. function 'OnInitialize' cannot be declared 'Overrides' because it does not override a function in a base class.
2.  'MinimumSplashScreenDisplayTime' is not a member of 'App.Loading.MyApplication'.
    3.  'OnInitialize' is not a member of 'Object'.
share|improve this question
1  
Of course the window doesn't load. You've told the thread loading it to take a five second nap. :-) Can you edit to explain what you're trying to accomplish with that delay? (You posted the Loading code, but there's no call to Sleep there. Where would you be using it? And why?) If we know what you're trying to do, we can probably help find an answer for you. –  Ken White Jul 12 '13 at 13:12
    
So you want to run something after 5 seconds whilst keeping the UI responsive? A timer? That looks for a 64bit processor is that correct? Why not environment.is64bitoperatingsystem –  Alex K. Jul 12 '13 at 13:13
2  
FYI, if you're using .NET 4.0+, you can figure out the environment with just Environment.Is64BitOperatingSystem –  Cory Jul 12 '13 at 13:14
    
Are you trying to implement a splash screen? –  Chris Dunaway Jul 12 '13 at 14:12
2  
@BrandonNguyen: Environment.Is64BitOperatingSystem detects the OS environment; Environment.Is64BitProcess detects whether the current process is 64-bit. –  Cory Jul 12 '13 at 14:55

5 Answers 5

Are you trying to implement a splash screen? --> @ChrisDunaway Yes, I'm doing a splash screen.

Go into Project Properties and leave your main form as the Startup form. Set your splash screen form as the splash screen entry down at the bottom. Now click the "View Application Events" button to the right and override OnIntialize so you can set the MinimumSplashScreenDisplayTime() like this:

Namespace My

    ' The following events are available for MyApplication:
    ' 
    ' Startup: Raised when the application starts, before the startup form is created.
    ' Shutdown: Raised after all application forms are closed.  This event is not raised if the application terminates abnormally.
    ' UnhandledException: Raised if the application encounters an unhandled exception.
    ' StartupNextInstance: Raised when launching a single-instance application and the application is already active. 
    ' NetworkAvailabilityChanged: Raised when the network connection is connected or disconnected.
    Partial Friend Class MyApplication

        Protected Overrides Function OnInitialize(ByVal commandLineArgs As System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection(Of String)) As Boolean
            ' Set the display time to 5000 milliseconds (5 seconds). 
            Me.MinimumSplashScreenDisplayTime = 5000
            Return MyBase.OnInitialize(commandLineArgs)
        End Function

    End Class


End Namespace

See here for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Another great solution. –  Neolisk Jul 12 '13 at 14:49

If you want to execute the rest of your code after 5 seconds, why not create a separate thread/task, which will wait for 5 seconds and then trigger the rest of your code to run via a callback to the main thread? This approach will not hang your UI.

EDIT: If you want a splash screen, drop a Timer control, set the interval to 5 seconds and run the rest of your code inside a Tick event handler.

Assuming you have already set up the Timer, move your loading code into Timer1_Tick handler:

Public Class Loading
  Private Sub Timer1_Tick(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Timer1.Tick
    'part 1
    If Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey("Hardware\Description\System\CentralProcessor\0").GetValue("Identifier").ToString.Contains("x86") Then
      My.Settings.Is64 = False
    Else
      My.Settings.Is64 = True
    End If

    'part 2
    If My.Settings.Is64 = True Then
      Form64.Show()
      Me.Close()
    Else
      MsgBox("No version developed for 32-bit computers.")
      End
    End If
  End Sub
End Class

Or leave part 1 in Load, and move part 2 into Tick. I would prefer this option for semantics.

Also don't forget to set Timer.Enabled = True.

share|improve this answer
    
I need help on that... –  Brandon Nguyen Jul 12 '13 at 14:28
    
@BrandonNguyen: First or second part? Second part should be very simple to do. Did you try implementing it this way? Where did you stumble? –  Neolisk Jul 12 '13 at 14:45
    
Second part. I have a timer and set the interval. –  Brandon Nguyen Jul 12 '13 at 15:03
    
@BrandonNguyen: see my edit. –  Neolisk Jul 12 '13 at 15:25

If you want a place to CANCEL the application, you use the Application.Startup event and set e.Cancel = True from within there. When this is done the main form will not even appear; the application will simply exit. That could look something like:

Namespace My

    ' The following events are available for MyApplication:
    ' 
    ' Startup: Raised when the application starts, before the startup form is created.
    ' Shutdown: Raised after all application forms are closed.  This event is not raised if the application terminates abnormally.
    ' UnhandledException: Raised if the application encounters an unhandled exception.
    ' StartupNextInstance: Raised when launching a single-instance application and the application is already active. 
    ' NetworkAvailabilityChanged: Raised when the network connection is connected or disconnected.
    Partial Friend Class MyApplication

        Private Sub MyApplication_Startup(sender As Object, e As Microsoft.VisualBasic.ApplicationServices.StartupEventArgs) Handles Me.Startup
            If someCondition Then
                MessageBox.Show("oops")
                e.Cancel = True ' <-- main form will NOT show, app will simply exit
            End If
        End Sub

    End Class


End Namespace
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Yeah, this would probably make more sense. Why wait 5 seconds to only discover the app is not supported on your system? –  Neolisk Jul 12 '13 at 15:30

just do this:

    For i As Integer = 1 To 500
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10)
        System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents()
    Next

Edit: Be careful with DoEvents; it can cause problems if the user clicks on something or an event is processed when it shouldn't. See http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2004/12/is-doevents-evil.html

share|improve this answer
    
if you like my answer be sure to click the check mark –  D_Bester Jul 12 '13 at 13:32
1  
DoEvents is bad, avoid using it if you can. –  Neolisk Jul 12 '13 at 14:09
    
@Neolisk Sure, but I still use it because it's much simpler. Setting up a background thread to handle the waiting would definitely be better especially if you expect the user to do anything other than just look at the screen. –  D_Bester Jul 12 '13 at 14:36
    
-1. I'd add a second downvote if I could for "I know DoEvents is bad, but I still use it because it's much simpler, and advise others to do so as well." - Bad advice. –  Ken White Jul 12 '13 at 14:49
    
@KenWhite Hey this guy is doing a splash screen; with no buttons to click, I don't see any problems with DoEvents here. However... I realize you've been programming since the early days of dBASE III+, working in dBASE, FoxPro, Clipper, C, C++, x86 assembler, and Delphi (among others). You're a veteran of the US Air Force; Bravo! You co-authored a Delphi/C++Builder function and component library (Clipper Functions for Delphi, or CFD). You even wrote one of the early QuickBooks API applications. Not to mention your 52k reputation on this site. I get your point and will be careful in the future. –  D_Bester Jul 12 '13 at 15:40

Since sleeping and busy waiting are generally frowned upon, you could do something with an AutoResetEvent:

Private ReadOnly _resetEvent As AutoResetEvent = New AutoResetEvent(False)

Sub Pause(ByVal milliseconds As Long)
    Dim waitInterval As TimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(milliseconds)
    While Not _resetEvent.WaitOne(waitInterval)
         ' Waiting!
    End While
End Sub

This is not recommended, but here's an example using the System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch class:

Sub Pause(ByVal milliseconds As Long)
    If milliseconds <= 0 Then Return
    Dim sw As New Stopwatch()
    sw.Start()
    Dim i As Long = 0
    Do
        If i Mod 50000 = 0 Then ' Check the timer every 50,000th iteration
            sw.Stop()
            If sw.ElapsedMilliseconds >= milliseconds Then
                Exit Do
            Else
                sw.Start()
            End If
        End If
        i += 1
    Loop
End Sub

And then where you need to pause, just call this Pause() method:

Pause(5000) ' Pause for 5 seconds
share|improve this answer
    
I am guilty of this, but everything I have come across says that busy waiting is a no-no. I have however not found a better way to give some buffer time in between (for example) loading html items, and those items pulling from the DB onto the page. –  Jason Bayldon Jul 12 '13 at 13:31

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