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The following code compiles as long as the return type of the recursive call is Any, but obviously I'm doing something wrong because it should not have to be Any.

  case class Group(
    id: Long = -1,
    parentId: Long = -1,
    name: String = "")

  def makeTree(groupId: Long, groups: List[Group]) = {
    def getAllChildren(gid: Long): Any = {
      def children = for {
        g <- groups; if g.parentId == gid
      } yield g

      if (children.isEmpty) List()
      else {
        children map { x =>
          getAllChildren(x.id)
        }
      }
    }
    getAllChildren(groupId)
  }                                               
  val groups = List(Group(1, 0, "A"), 
                    Group(2, 1, "B"), 
                    Group(3, 1, "C"), 
                    Group(4, 2, "D"))

  makeTree(1, groups)
  //Results in: Any = List(List(List()), List())
  }

If I change the signature of getAllChildren to:

def getAllChildren(gid: Long): List[Group]

then I get an error:

type mismatch;  found   : List[List[Group]]  required: List[Group]

What am I doing wrong here.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not really speaking scala, but it looks like, for some id, you collect the groups with that id, and then replace each group with a list of it's children, and so on.

Specifically, here:

  if (children.isEmpty) List()
  else {
    children map { x =>
      getAllChildren(x.id)
     }
  }

Indeed, here is the root of your error: Your algorithm allows for infinite recursion, and each recursion adds another List[...] around your return type. But you can't have a type with dynamic depth.

For example, if you try to fix this by giving type List[List[Group]], it will complain that it found List[List[List[Group]]], and so on, until you give up.

This is the way typecheckers tell us that we're about to program a potentially infinite recursion. You may have assumed the invariant that your hierarchy can't involve loops, yet this is not reflected in the types. In fact, it is not hard to construct an example where two groups are each others parents. In that case, your program will produce an ever deeper nesting list until it terminates due to lack of memory.

Note that you can't fix your code simply by using flatMap instead of map: the reason being that getAllChildren never ever produces a list with Group elements. It either returns an empty list, or, a flattened list of empty lists, that is, an empty list. Hence, if it should return at all, it would return an empty list in the flatmap version.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the great explanation Ingo. I see now why I always get empty lists. Chirlo's example does return content, but unfortunately flatMap causes the structure of the parent child relationships to be lost. I'm trying to build a tree. I suppose I can fix this by creating my own collection type, but I was hoping for a simple fix to my current code. Just to see if it's possible. –  JacobusR Jul 12 '13 at 17:39

You need to change the call to children map ... for children flatMap ..., otherwise you're not returning a List[Group] but potentially a List[List[.....]] like @Ingo suggests. flatMap will map each element to a List and then flatten all lists to create just one List[Group] containing all children.

EDIT: As @Ingo points out, even if flatMap would solve the typing problem, your function still doesn't work, since you always return an empty List. You should go for

children flatMap { x => x :: getAllChildren(x.id, acc) }

to prepend the child to the child's children.

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1  
Note that this wont work as it stands. getAllChildren never produces a list that actually contains Group elements. Think about it. –  Ingo Jul 12 '13 at 15:02
    
Right, he always returns an empty List. I added a solution to the answer –  Chirlo Jul 12 '13 at 15:51
    
Yep, looks better. However, we should also have detection of cycles in the input to prevent infinite loops. Consider groups = List(Group(1,2,"A"), Group(2,3,"B"), Group(3,1,"C")) –  Ingo Jul 12 '13 at 16:35
    
Thank you very much Chirlo. Unfortunately this flattens the whole structure. My broken version returns empty lists, but the structure stays in tact: List(List(List()), List()). Using flatMap unfortunately causes the structure to disappear:List(Group(2,1,B), Group(4,2,D), Group(3,1,C)). I am trying to represent the tree of parents with their children as lists. Thanks for the great help so far. –  JacobusR Jul 12 '13 at 17:35
    
Ok, but then returning List[Group] doesn't fit your needs. –  Chirlo Jul 12 '13 at 21:19

Your code will work if you flatten the list returned on children map like this:

def makeTree(groupId: Long, groups: List[Group]) = {
  def getAllChildren(gid: Long): List[Group] = {
    def children = for {
      g <- groups; if g.parentId == gid
    } yield g

    if (children.isEmpty) List()
    else {
      val listList = children map { x =>
        x :: getAllChildren(x.id)
      }

      listList.flatten
    }
  }
  getAllChildren(groupId)
}

The reason this is happening is that you are taking a List[Group] and mapping it over a function that also returns a List[Group], thus resulting in a List[List[Group]]. Simply flattening that List will produce the desired result.

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"Simply flattening that List will produce the desired result." - no, it won't, unless the empty list is the desired result. And when the data introduce cycles, it'll not even terminate. –  Ingo Jul 12 '13 at 15:03

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