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How do i calculate the remainder for extremely large exponential numbers using java ? eg. (48^26)/2401

I tried using BIGINTEGER, however it gave the same output for large divisors.I'm not sure if BIG INTEGER can do this .I have tried all other PRIMITIVE data type.They seem to be insufficient.

FYI it tried the following code:

BigInteger a = new BigInteger("48");
a = a.pow(26);
BigInteger b = new BigInteger("2401");//49*49
a = a.mod(b);
System.out.println(a);

I don't know why i got the same output everytime, it's weird that it's working fine now. The answer comes out to be 1128

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4  
What did you try with BigInteger? –  SLaks Jul 12 '13 at 13:51
1  
The result is 1254, computed with bg integers, they work just fine. –  Ingo Jul 12 '13 at 13:56
    
Are you talking about Big Mod? There is a divide and conquer way to achieve that –  higuaro Jul 12 '13 at 13:58
    
BiInteger has to work. Can you please provide the code you used where you say it gave incorrect results: "same output for large divisors"? You are remembering that BigInteger is immutable, right? –  enl8enmentnow Jul 12 '13 at 14:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use repeated modulus of smaller numbers.

say you have

(a * b) % n
((A * n + AA) * (B * n + BB)) % n                     | AA = a %n & BB = b % n
(A * B * n^2 + A * N * BB + AA * B * n + AA * BB) % n
AA * BB % n                                           since x * n % n == 0
(a % n) * (b % n) % n

In your case, you can write

48^26 % 2401
(48^2) ^ 13 % 2401

as

int n = 48;
for (int i = 1; i < 26; i++)
    n = (n * 48) % 2401;
System.out.println(n);

int n2 = 48 * 48;
for (int i = 1; i < 13; i++)
    n2 = (n2 * 48 * 48) % 2401;
System.out.println(n2);

System.out.println(BigInteger.valueOf(48).pow(26).mod(BigInteger.valueOf(2401)));

prints

1128
1128
1128

As @Ruchina points out, your example is small enough to calculate using a simple double expression.

for (int i = 1; i < 100; i++) {
    BigInteger mod = BigInteger.valueOf(48).pow(i).mod(BigInteger.valueOf(2401));
    double x = Math.pow(48, i) % 2401;
    if (mod.intValue() != x) {
        System.out.println(i + ": " + mod + " vs " + x);
        break;
    }
}

prints

34: 736 vs 839.0

In other words, any power of 48 is fine up to 33.

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You were faster and your code is more elegant. I won't repeat what you said. –  Leeward Jul 12 '13 at 14:17
2  
It's not because its small that its work with double, its pure chance in loss of precision (try modulo 2400 or 2402 instead). –  jolivier Jul 12 '13 at 14:24
    
Thanks for the solution. –  bluelurker Jul 15 '13 at 4:02
    
@bluelurker You can accept an answer by clicking the tick on the left. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 15 '13 at 7:21

This worked for me.

import java.math.BigInteger;


public class BigMod{
        public static void main (String[] args){
                BigInteger b1 = new BigInteger ("48");
                BigInteger b2 = new BigInteger ("2401");
                BigInteger b3 = b1.pow(26);
                BigInteger result = b3.mod(b2);
                System.out.println(result);
        }
}

Not sure what trouble you're having with BigInteger. Can you explain what didn't work?

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Use BigInteger.modPow().

BigInteger a = new BigInteger("48");
BigInteger b = new BigInteger("26");
BigInteger c = new BigInteger("2401");

BigInteger answer = a.modPow(b, c);

The answer will be 1128. Note that BigInteger is immutable so objects a, b, and c can not be modified.

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You don't even need a BigInteger for this, you can calculate that value using BigMod divide and conquer algorithm taking advantage of the following property of the mod operation

(A * B) mod n = ((A mod n) * (B mod n)) mod n

Then (B ^ c) mod n can be viewed as a special case of the property:

(B ^ c) mod n = ((B mod n) * (B mod n) ... c times) mod n

The following code does the calculation:

public class BigModExample { 
    public static long bigMod(long  b, long  c, int n) {
        if (c == 0) {
            return 1;
        }

        // Returns: (b ^ c/2) mod n
        long b2 = bigMod(b, c / 2, n);        

        // Even exponent
        if ((c & 1) == 0) {
            // [((b ^ c/2) mod n) * ((b ^ c/2) mod n)] mod n
            return (b2 * b2) % n;
        } else {
            // Odd exponent
            // [(b mod n) * ((b ^ c/2) mod n) * ((b ^ c/2) mod n)] mod n
            return ((b % n) * (b2 * b2)) % n;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {
        System.out.println(bigMod(48, 26, 2401));
    }
}

Prints

1128
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 BigDecimal b= BigDecimal.valueOf(Math.pow(48,26) %2401);

output b = 1128.0
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I suggest you run this and see what you get. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 12 '13 at 14:03
    
I have run and got the answer as 1128.0. –  Ruchira Gayan Ranaweera Jul 12 '13 at 14:05
    
@PeterLawrey your method gives the same answer here –  Ruchira Gayan Ranaweera Jul 12 '13 at 14:08
    
+1 you may an excellent point about the example. I have updated my answer to show that powers up to 33 would work. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 12 '13 at 14:20
1  
@Ruchira yes, but Pater Lawrey example is correct, compare 48^26 with the numbers involved in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_precision. You are very very lucky to get the correct result and you dont use BigDecimal at all. –  jolivier Jul 12 '13 at 14:25

Further explanation on Peter Lawrey's solution.

(a*b)%n
= ((A*n + AA) * (B*n + BB))%n where a=A*n+AA, AA=a%n & b=B*n+BB, BB=b%n
= (A*B*n^2 + A*n*BB + AA*B*n + AA*BB)%n
= (AA*BB)%n
= (a%n * b%n)%n

(a^c)%n
= (a^(c-1) * a)%n
= ((a^(c-1))%n * a%n)%n
= ((a^(c-2)*a)%n * a%n)%n
= ((a^(c-2)%n * a%n)%n * a%n)%n

Example1: when c is 3

(a^3)%n
= ((a^2)*a)%n
= ((a^2)%n * a%n)%n
= ((a*a)%n * a%n)%n 
= ((a%n * a%n)%n * a%n)%n

Example2: when c is 4

(a^4)%n
= ((a^3)*a)%n
= ((a^3)%n * a%n)%n
= ((a^2 * a)%n * a%n)%n
= (((a^2)%n * a%n)%n * a%n)%n
= (((a*a)%n * a%n)%n * a%n)%n
= ((a%n * a%n)%n * a%n)%n * a%n)%n

java code:

int a = 48;
int c = 26;
int n = 2401;
int a_mod_n = a%n;
int result = a_mod_n;
for (int i = 1; i < c; i++) {
    result = (result * a_mod_n) % n;
}
System.out.println("result: " + result);

48 is ambiguous as both a and a%n are 48. The above Java code strictly follows the equation ((a^(c-2)%n * a%n)%n * a%n)%n so that it is easier to understand.

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Try using a BigDecimal for large decimal numbers. It is not prone to errors like double and float because of the way it's data is stored. Also, it has a (potentially) infinite amount of decimal places.

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1  
@TheNewIdiot BigInteger differs considerably from BigDecimal for the approach of division. –  Joop Eggen Jul 12 '13 at 14:08

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