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Is there a way to find out by reflection whether a constructor is a compiler generated default constructor or not? Or is there some other way?

Surprisingly the isSynthetic method does not give this information so it can't be used. And there is no Generated annotation present.

public class JavaTest {
    public void run() throws Exception {
        out.println(JavaTest.class.getConstructors()[0].isSynthetic()); // Prints false
        out.println(Arrays.asList(JavaTest.class.getConstructors()[0].getAnnotations())); // Prints []
    }
}

This question asks the same thing but for C#: Detect compiler generated default constructor using reflection in C#

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5  
I guess the answer'd be same as C#'s answer :) – PermGenError Jul 12 '13 at 16:01
1  
Automatic default constructor is definitely a language design mistake. In an ideal world, it doesn't exist, so why do you even care:) What feature depends on the detection of default constructor? – bayou.io Jul 12 '13 at 16:15
    
Automatic default constructor are great! It's for doing static analysis. If I know that a constructor is default than I know, by only looking of the declaration on the class, that it is empty and doesn't, for example, leak the this pointer anyplace. – Lii Jul 12 '13 at 16:21
1  
@Lii, I believe you are mistaken about the lack of a constructor implying no leak of this during construction. I can easily write a class that has no explicit constructor, but has an (instance) initializer block that uses this. Have a look at ideone.com/5uPJJU – Dilum Ranatunga Jul 12 '13 at 19:19
    
@DilumRanatunga: Ah, you are right of course. – Lii Jul 12 '13 at 19:27
up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, the compiler generates them:

I created the file A.java:

public class A{
public String t(){return "";}
}

then:

javac A.java

and running javap -c A to see the content:

Compiled from "A.java"
public class A {
  public A();
    Code:
       0: aload_0       
       1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
       4: return        

  public java.lang.String t();
    Code:
       0: ldc           #2                  // String 
       2: areturn       
}

if I add the constructor:

public A(){}

the result is:

Compiled from "A.java"
public class A {
  public A();
    Code:
       0: aload_0       
       1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
       4: return        

  public java.lang.String t();
    Code:
       0: ldc           #2                  // String 
       2: areturn       
}

it's identical. I'm using Java 7 with 64 bit OpenJDK, but I'd bet that it's the same with all the versions.

EDIT: in fact, the same bytecode alone doesn't guarantee that the information is not present as metadata. Using an hex editor and this program was possible to see that there are two bytes differing, and correspond to the line numbers (used for printing stack traces), so the information is absent in this case.

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It seams reasonable that a generated default constructor and an empty constructor produce the same bytecode. But there could still be some meta data with information about this. – Lii Jul 12 '13 at 16:18
    
Ah, examining the class file in a raw data editor should settle it! Thanks. – Lii Jul 13 '13 at 11:58

No, there is no metadata in the bytecode that would allow you to distinguish a compiler generated default constructor from a non-generated one.

In most cases, compiler generated constructors and methods are marked with the ACC_SYNTHETIC flag or the Synthetic attribute in the generated bytecode. However, there are a few notable exceptions as per 13.1 item 7 from the Java Language Spec and 4.7.8 from the jvm-spec

Here is the relevant bit from the JLS:

Any constructs introduced by a Java compiler that do not have a corresponding construct in the source code must be marked as synthetic, except for default constructors, the class initialization method, and the values and valueOf methods of the Enum class

As far as I know, javap does not show the ACC_SYNTHETIC flag but you would be able to read it through isSynthetic if it was set.

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