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There are many questions about "when do I use reference and when pointers?". They confused me a little bit. I thought a reference wouldn't take any memory because it's just the address.

Now I made a simple Date class and showed them the community of code-review. They told me not to use the reference in the following example. But why?
Someone told me that it'll allocate the same memory a pointer would allocate. That's the opposite of what I learned.

class A{
int a;
public:
   void setA(const int& b) { a = b; } /* Bad! - But why?*/
};

class B{
int b;
public:
   void setB(int c) { b = c; } /* They told me to do this */
};

So when do I use references or pointers in arguments and when just a simple copy? Without the reference in my example, is the constant unnecessary?

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4  
"They told me not to use the reference in the following example. But why?" Didn't they say why? It's not very useful to get code review comments without an explanatory reason. Can't you ask them why? –  Daniel Daranas Jul 12 '13 at 16:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you has light-weight type like a int or long you should use passing by value, because there won't be additional costs from work with references. But when you passing some heavy types, you should use references

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Short and easy to understand. Thank you (although a little late... hehe) –  Davlog Sep 8 '13 at 10:28

It is not guaranteed to be bad. But it is unnecessary in this specific case.

In many (or most) contexts, references are implemented as pointers in disguise. Your example happens to be one of those cases. Assuming that the function does not get inlined, parameter b will be implemented "under the hood" as a pointer. So, what you really pass into setA in the first version is a pointer to int, i.e. something that provides indirect access to your argument value. In the second version you pass an immediate int, i.e. something that provides direct access to your argument value.

Which is better and which is worse? Well, a pointer in many cases has greater size than an int, meaning that the first variant might passes larger amount of data. This might be considered "bad", but since both data types will typically fit into the hardware word size, it will probably make no appreciable difference, especially if parameters are passed in CPU registers.

Also, in order to read b inside the function you have to dereference that disguised pointer. This is also "bad" from the performance point of view.

These are the formal reasons one would prefer to pass by value any parameters of small size (smaller or equal to pointer size). For parameters or bigger size, passing by const reference becomes a better idea (assuming you don't explicitly require a copy).

However, in most cases a function that simple will probably be inlined, which will completely eliminate the difference between the two variants, regardless of which parameter type you use.


The matter of const being unnecessary in the second variant is a different story. In the first variant that const serves two important purposes:

1) It prevents you from modifying the parameter value, and thus protects the actual argument from modification. If the reference weren't const, you would be able to modify the reference parameter and thus modify the argument.

2) It allows you to use rvalues as arguments, e.g. call some_obj.setA(5). Without that const such calls would be impossible.

In the second version neither of this is an issue. There's no need to protect the actual argument from modification, since the parameter is a local copy of that argument. Regardless of what you do to the parameter, the actual argument will remain unchanged. And you can already use rvalues as arguments to SetA regardless of whether the parameter is declared const or not.

For this reason people don't normally use top-level const qualifiers on parameters passed by value. But if you do declare it const, it will simply prevent you from modifying the local b inside the function. Some people actually like that, since it enforces the moderately popular "don't modify original parameter values" convention, for which reason you might sometimes see top-level const qualifiers being used in parameter declarations.

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Nice answer, but I'd suggest replacing "a reference is just a pointer" with "a reference is just implemented using a pointer". If one doesn't know much about the two, eventually they will make the "pointers are arrays"-style "references are pointers" mistake. –  user529758 Jul 12 '13 at 18:13

I agree with the reviewer. And here's why:

A (const or non-const) reference to a small simple type, such as int will be more complex (in terms of number of instructions). This is because the calling code will have to pass the address of the argument into setA, and then inside setA the value has to be dereferenced from the address stored in b. In the case where b is a plain int, it just copies the value itself. So there is at least one step of a memory reference in saving. This may not make much of a difference in a long runtime of a large program, but if you keep adding one extra cycle everywhere you do this, then it does soon add up to noticeably slower.

I had a look at a piece of code that went something like this:

class X
{
   vector v;
  public: 
   ... 
   void find(int& index, int b); 
   ....
}

bool  X::find(int &index, int b)
{
   while(v[index] != b)
   {
       if (index == v.size()-1)
       {
           return false;
       }
       index++; 
   }
   return true;
}

Rewriting this code to:

bool  X::find(int &index, int b)
{
   int i = index;
   while(v[i] != b)
   {
       if (i == v.size()-1)
       {
           index = i;
           return false;
       }
       i++; 
   }
   index = i; 
   return true;
}

meant that this function went from about 30% of the total execution of some code that called find quite a bit, to about 5% of the execution time of the same test. Because the compiler put i in a register, and only updated the reference value when it finished searching.

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References are implemented as pointers (that's not a requirement, but it's universally true, I believe).

So in your first one, since you're just passing an "int", passing the pointer to that int will take about the same amount of space to pass (same or more registers, or same or more stack space, depending on your architecture), so there's no savings there. Plus now you have to dereference that pointer, which is an extra operation (and will almost surely cause you to go to memory, which you might not have to do with the second one, again, depending on your architecture).

Now, if what you're passing is much larger than an int, then the first one could be better because you're only passing a pointer. [NB that there are cases where it still might make sense to pass by value even for a very large object. Those cases are usually when you plan to create your own copy anyway. In that case, it's better to let the compiler do the copy, because the overall approach may improve it's ability to optimize. Those cases are very complex, and my opinion is that if you're asking this question, you should study C++ more before you try to tackle them. Although they do make for interesting reading.]

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Passing primitives as const-reference does not save you anything. A pointer and an int use the same amount of memory. If you pass a const-reference, the machine will have to allocate memory for a pointer and copy the pointer address, which has the same cost as allocating and copying an integer. If your Date class uses a single 64-bit integer (or double) to store the date, then you don't need to use const-reference. However, if your Data class becomes more complex and stores additional fields, then passing the Date object by const-reference should have a lower cost than passing it by value.

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