Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working with an API that gives me large immutable lists which look like this:

class List<T> {
    final T e;
    final List<T> next;
    public List(T e, List<T> next) {
        this.e = e;
        this.next = next;
    }
}

I want to create a copy of the list with certain elements changed somehow. It turns out, it's not as simple as I initially thought. This test code creates a list of integers from 0 to 9000. This is to emulate the kind of data I would get back from the API:

class A {
    static {
        List<Integer> l = null;
        for (int i = 9000; i >= 0; i--) l = new List<Integer>(i,l);
        List<Integer> l2 = B.incrementList(l);
        System.out.println(l.e           + " -> " + l2.e);
        System.out.println(l.next.e      + " -> " + l2.next.e);
        System.out.println(l.next.next.e + " -> " + l2.next.next.e);
    }
}

I increment each item using recursion, as there is no other way:

class B {
    static List<Integer> incrementList(List<Integer> l) {
        return l == null ? null : 
            new List<Integer>(l.e+1, incrementList(l.next));
    }
}

And this works fine:

0 -> 1
1 -> 2
2 -> 3
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: main

But once I have over 9000 elements, I get StackOverflowError (change i to start at 10000 instead of 9000 in A):

javac A.java && java A
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError
    at B.incrementList(A.java:33)
    at B.incrementList(A.java:33)
    at B.incrementList(A.java:33)
    [...]
    at B.incrementList(A.java:33)
    at B.incrementList(A.java:33)
    at B.incrementList(A.java:33)
Could not find the main class: A. Program will exit.

So I changed B to use a different strategy to increment the list elements:

class B {
    static List<Integer> incrementList(List<Integer> l) {
        return ListIncrementer.call(l);
    }
}

class ListIncrementer extends Thread {
    List<Integer> l;
    List<Integer> result;
    ListIncrementer(List<Integer> l) {
        this.l = l;
    }
    public void run() {
        if (l == null) {
            result = null;
            return;
        }
        result = new List<Integer>(l.e+1,call(l.next));
    }
    static List<Integer> call(List<Integer> l) {
        ListIncrementer li = new ListIncrementer(l);
        li.start();
        try { li.join(); } catch (Exception _) {}
        return li.result;
    }
}

Instead of using the stack, it creates a new thread to calculate each next element. This avoids any chance of StackOverflowError:

javac A.java && java A
0 -> 1
1 -> 2
2 -> 3
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: main

It works, as expected.

However, I can still only do about 30000 elements using this method, this is what happens when I set i in A to 50000:

Exception in thread "Thread-32290" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: unable to create new native thread
    at java.lang.Thread.start0(Native Method)
    at java.lang.Thread.start(Thread.java:657)
    at ListIncrementer.call(A.java:25)
    at ListIncrementer.run(A.java:21)
0 -> 1
1 -> 2
2 -> 3
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: main

(Note the start of the list is successfully created, but somewhere at the end it breaks and ends up null)

Which means it's still not as good as the plain iteration used to build the list. This brings me to think perhaps it's not possible to manipulate large immutable lists. I often hear Java developers saying best practice is to use immutable structures, yet, I can't find any libraries that do this (other than the API I mentioned), and I can't make it work on my own. How have other developers been able to make such accomplishments?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Do it iteratively, instead of recursively. (Also, "immutable lists" don't have to be designed the way you're doing it, as a linked list.)

share|improve this answer

You transform your recursive function to a loop (pseudocode):

List increment(List in) {
    List out = new empty list;

    while (in is not empty) {
         out = new out(in.e+1, out);
         in = in.next;
    }
    return need it in same order as before? reverse(out) : out;
}

Often, it is not needed to reverse the resulting list, as the order is immaterial, or you have another transformation to do anyway.

share|improve this answer

Don't use recursion. Use iterative loops:

class B {
    static List<Integer> incrementList(List<Integer> l) {
        ArrayList<Integer> elements = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        while (l != null) {
            elements.add(l.e + 1);
            l = l.next; 
        }
        List<Integer> result = null;
        for (int i = elements.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
            result = new List<Integer>(elements.get(i), result);
        }  
        return result;
    }
}

That said, such a List implementation, espacially named List like the standard java.util.List, is not really a good idea.

share|improve this answer
    
What's wrong with this List implementation? –  Dog Jul 12 '13 at 17:09
    
It's extremely unpleasant to use (as the OP's question shows), it exposes its internals in public attributes, and it uses a name that is already used in 2 out of 3 Java classes to refer to another, standard class. –  JB Nizet Jul 12 '13 at 17:12
    
so how would you make a pleasant to use immutable list? lets ignore the name "issue" here since it's trivial to rename. why do you care about making the fields private if they are immutable? –  Dog Jul 12 '13 at 17:18
1  
I would use Guava's ImutableList instead of reinventing the wheel. And making the fields public, even if it doesn't make the class mutable, makes it imposssible to change its implementation. That's the whole point of encapsulation: being able to change the internal, private implementation without changing the public interface. –  JB Nizet Jul 12 '13 at 17:22
    
change the implementation of what? reading fields? –  Dog Jul 12 '13 at 17:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.