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the simplest way to calculate 2^32 is 2*2*2*2*2......= 4294967296 , I want to know that is there any other way to get 4294967296? (2^16 * 2^16 is treated as the same method as 2*2*2.... )

and How many ways to calculate it?
Is there any function to calculate it?

I can't come up with any methods to calculate it without 2*2*2...

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2  
Solve log2(x)-32==0 –  Slater Tyranus Jul 12 '13 at 16:47
    
possible duplicate of Calculating powers (e.g. 2^11) quickly –  RGG Jul 12 '13 at 16:48
1  
Why are you calculating at all? Here's a function that calculates 4294967296: f() = 4294967296. –  harold Jul 12 '13 at 16:55
    
Without Fancy(tm) computer operations, doubling a number is as simple as adding it to itself. So, doubling '1' 32 times -- 1 + 1 is 2, 2 + 2 is 4, etc -- suffices. –  Kaganar Jul 12 '13 at 16:56
    
On a system where int is 32 bits: -1U + 1ULL. –  celtschk Jul 15 '13 at 1:26

6 Answers 6

2 << 31

is a bit shift. It effectively raises 2 to the 32nd power.

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1  
I didn't downvote, but so what it uses two? Shifting one by 32 isn't any less correct. –  harold Jul 12 '13 at 16:51
    
Meh. The operand being raised by a power is 2, not 1. –  Robert Harvey Jul 12 '13 at 16:52
    
I did downvote it, but for a second I was 100% sure that there was 2 << 32. Nevermind it though –  pivovarit Jul 12 '13 at 16:52
1  
@pivovarit It was. SO does not show edits that occurred in the first instants. –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 12 '13 at 16:53
3  
I like to think of x << y as x * 2^y. –  Mysticial Jul 12 '13 at 16:54

Options:

  1. 1 << 32
  2. 2^32 = (2^32 - 1) + 1 = (((2^32 - 1) + 1) - 1) + 1 = ...
  3. Arrange 32 items on a table. Count the ways you can choose subsets of them.
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If you are not much of a fan of binary magic, then I would suggest quickpower.This function computes xn in O(logn) time.

 int qpower(int x,int n)
 {
   if(n==0)return 1;
   if(n==1)return x;
   int mid=qpower(x,n/2);
   if(n%2==0)return mid*mid;
   return x*mid*mid;
 }
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If you are on a common computer you can left bitshift 2 by 31 (i.e. 2<<31) to obtain 2^32.

In standard C:

unsigned long long x = 2ULL << 31;

unsigned long long is needed since a simple unsigned long is not guaranteed to be large enough to store the value of 2<<31.

In section 5.2.4.2.1 paragraph 1 of the C99 standard:

... the following shall be replaced by expressions that have the same type as would an expression that is an object of the corresponding type converted according to the integer promotions. Their implementation-defined values shall be equal or greater in magnitude (absolute value) to those shown, with the same sign.

— maximum value for an object of type unsigned long int

ULONG_MAX 4294967295 // 2^32 - 1

— maximum value for an object of type unsigned long long int

ULLONG_MAX 18446744073709551615 // 2^64 - 1

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In what you have written, unsigned long long x = 2<<32;, if it is C, the shift is on an int. This is undefined behavior most everywhere (shifting by more than the width of the type is). –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 12 '13 at 16:49
3  
And it is either 1 << 32 or 2 << 31. –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 12 '13 at 16:50
    
@PascalCuoq Would an explicit cast as such prevent the UB? –  Vilhelm Gray Jul 12 '13 at 16:51
1  
Yes, ((unsigned long long)2)<<32 is defined. I edited my first comment to include the original code for future readers. –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 12 '13 at 16:52
1  
Instead of the clumsy (unsigned long long)2 you could also simply write 2ULL –  celtschk Jul 15 '13 at 1:17

Why not using Math.Pow() (in .NET). I think most language (or environment) would support the similar function for you:

Math.Pow(2,32);
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1  
The OP didn't specify a programming platform. –  Robert Harvey Jul 12 '13 at 17:01
    
@RobertHarvey I guess most languages would support the similar function Pow(), he asked this Is there any function to calculate it? So I think it's a choice. Thank you anyway. –  King King Jul 12 '13 at 17:03

In Groovy/Java you can do something like following with long number (signed integer can be max 2^31 in Java)

long twoPOW32 = 1L << 32;
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