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I'm just starting to get into C++ again after not using the language for more than a year so please be patient.

I have a class with a method that takes a reference to an object of a different class as an argument. The code pretty much looks like this : (full code on pastebin)

//Entity.h
namespace xe {    
class Entity {...}
}

//Component.h
#include "entity.h"

class Entity;
namespace xe{
class Component
{
  public : 
  void set_parent(Entity&);
  private :
  Entity* m_parent;
}
}

//Component.cpp
#include "component.h"

xe::Component::set_parent(Entity& entity) { m_parent = &entity;}

//Main.cpp
#include "Entity.h"
#include "Component.h"
int main()
{
  Entity entity(1 /*id*/);
  Component comp;
  comp.set_parent(entity);
}
}

This code triggers the following compile error (visual studio)

error c2664:xe::Component::set_parent(Entity&) : cannot convert parameter 1 from xe::Entity to Entity&

Meanwhile the following code runs and compiles perfectly fine

void square(int& i)
{
  i *= i;
}
int main()
{
  int number = 2;
  square(number);
  std::cout<<number;
}

Now like I said, I'm not a C++ expert but to me the only difference between the two functions is that square() takes a reference to a primitive data type(int) while do_something() takes a reference to an instance of a class. I couldn't find anything about passing class objects by reference and I already tried several alternatives (making the reference const, explicitly creating a variable of type Bar& and passing that to the method) but nothing worked, so I thought I'd ask here.

share|improve this question
5  
Your code must be different. That compiles once you fix the obvious issues. – chris Jul 12 '13 at 18:15
2  
As @chris wrote – Andy Prowl Jul 12 '13 at 18:16
2  
As @AndyProwl wrote, with a different IDE – user529758 Jul 12 '13 at 18:18
    
As H2C03 wrote, using gnu g++. – cforbish Jul 12 '13 at 18:22
    
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is the line

class Entity;

This tells the compiler that there is a class Entity at global scope. This class is different from the class Entity you define within the namespace. main() resides in global namespace, and thus uses the forward declaration. However, the line

comp.set_parent(entity);

tries to pass an object of this global scope class to a function defined within your namespace, which consequently expects an object of the class within that namespace.

To fix this, you need to delete the line with the forward declaration and change the instanciation of entity to

xe::Entity entity(1 /*id*/);

Edit: There was a number of other namespace/scope related problems in the code, the version below compiles without error. I would suggest that take a close look at each error you got and then at what changes I made at that position, because you absolutely need to learn reading these kinds of error messages when programming in C++.

//Entity.h
#pragma once
#include<memory>
#include<list>    //necessary to use std::list

namespace xe {
    class Component;    //must be inside namespace xe

    class Entity {
    public :
        Entity(unsigned int);
        std::list<std::unique_ptr<Component>> m_components;
        void add_component(Component&);
    private :
        unsigned int m_id;
    };
}

//Entity.cpp
#include "Entity.h"

xe::Entity::Entity(unsigned int id) {    //the name needs to reference the constructor _within_ the class, not the class itself
    m_id = id;
}

void xe::Entity::add_component(xe::Component& component) {    //Never forget the return type (unless you are writing a constructor/destructor, which do not have a return type. Also, component was misspelled...
    m_components.push_back(std::unique_ptr<Component>(&component));
}

//Component.h
#pragma once
#include "Entity.h"
//class Entity;   //Unnecessary, it's already defined within Entity.h.
namespace xe {
    class Component {
        public :
            void set_parent(xe::Entity&);

        private :
            xe::Entity* m_parent;
    };
}

//Component.cpp
#include "Component.h"
void xe::Component::set_parent(Entity& parent) {    //Same problem as with the function above.
    m_parent = &parent;
}

//main.cpp
int main() {
    xe::Entity entity(1);    //main is not within the namespace, nor does it use it, so you need the scope resolution operator here.
    xe::Component comp;    //as above
    entity.add_component(comp);
    comp.set_parent(entity);    //No error anymore...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or put your forward declaration inside xe namespace as well. – biocomp Jul 12 '13 at 18:52
    
@biocomp: But then it appears to me to be a noop since Component.h already includes Entity.h. – cmaster Jul 12 '13 at 18:54
    
When I remove the forward declaration, nearly every line in component.h causes a compile-errors most of which don't even make sense like "missing type specifier - int assumed" in xe::Entity* m_parent; – Max Jul 12 '13 at 19:05
    
Just a hunch: Does the problem persist if you add semicolons at the end of your class declarations? I think I remeber C++ acting strangely when I forget those... – cmaster Jul 12 '13 at 19:15
    
@cmaster: Yes, you're right, did not notice that. To Max: It's better to provide code samples which actually compile. It'll help us detect problems and help you better. – biocomp Jul 12 '13 at 19:24

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