Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a beginning programmer who is trying to write a simple binary search program. I have messed around with this program with several days but have not had any luck getting it to run as it should. I keep getting the errors double cannot be derefrenced and possible loss of precision when I try to compile the program in java. Thanks you very much for any help you can give.

The program in question is right below. ( I have used the example from a book I have but even that I have not been able to get it to work quite right) Someone said that I should tell the exact errors and they are double could not be derefrenced if( a[ mid ].compareTo( x ) < 0 ) and double could not be dereferenced else if( a[ mid ].compareTo( x ) > 0).

EDIT: I have received some help and have changed some doubles to integers

public class Search
{
    public static final int NOT_FOUND = -1;
    public static double binarySearch(double[] a , double x)
    {
        int low=0;
        int high = a.length -1;
        int mid;
        while( low <= high )
        {
            mid = ( low + high ) / 2;

            if( a[ mid ].compareTo( x ) < 0 )
                low = mid + 1;
            else if( a[ mid ].compareTo( x ) > 0)
                high = mid - 1;
            else 
                return mid;
        }
        return NOT_FOUND;
    }

    public static void main( String[] args)
    {
        int SIZE = 6;
        double[] a = {-3,10,5,24,45.3,10.5};
        for (int i= 0; i<SIZE ; i++)
        a[i] = new Integer(i *2);
        for (int i= 0; i<SIZE*2; i++)
            System.out.println("Found" + i + " at " + binarySearch(a, 45.3 ));
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
At least tell us the exact and complete error messages you get. –  JB Nizet Jul 12 '13 at 18:51
    
Also, a is a double array. Why do you store Integer inside? Store doubles in a double array. And indices in an array are ints. Don't use doubles to store integer indices. –  JB Nizet Jul 12 '13 at 18:53
add comment

closed as unclear what you're asking by bmargulies, rgettman, tmyklebu, ryan1234, Avadhani Y Jul 13 '13 at 2:50

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're using double low and friends to reference indexes in the array. You need to use ints for this.

int low = 0;
int high = a.length - 1;
int mid;

You're also overwriting your values here:

double[] a = {-3,10,5,24,45.3,10.5};
for (int i= 0; i<SIZE ; i++)
    a[i] = new Integer(i *2);

You start with a with the values of -3, 10, 5... but then you immediate overwrite them with 0, 2, 4 ... in a for loop there. I'm not sure why...

But those are just kind of side notes. The reason it won't compile is that you're trying to use compareTo() on a double - now it should be autoboxing, but for whatever reason it isn't. So instead, you need to use Double.compare(a[low],x). It has the added bonus of saving Object creations.

share|improve this answer
    
That helps a lot but I am still getting that double cannot be derefrenced error –  user2577548 Jul 12 '13 at 19:05
    
Did you make the change at the bottom about Double.compare(a[low],x) instead of a[low].compareTo(x)? –  corsiKa Jul 12 '13 at 19:06
    
yeah and my errors bloomed from 2 to 57. I really don't get why it would do that as far as I can see you are right and it would just avoid object creation, but it did. I also got rid of that bit at the end that was causing replacement problems. It was leftover from the code I started with as an example ut i guess I had forgotten it was in there –  user2577548 Jul 12 '13 at 19:09
1  
That's good! The compiler goes in phases. It checks one set of things, then another set, and so on. If you went from 2 to 57, it's probably because you made it past one set of possible errors, and now it's giving you a whole new set of errors to fix. That's a great thing, because you're closer to getting it to compile. –  corsiKa Jul 12 '13 at 19:11
    
Oh I figured it out. The problem was that you had double.compare(a[low],x) and it was originally and needed to be changed to a[mid]. Thank you so much for all the help. This was really frustrating me and I an very happy that you were able to help me. Thanks again –  user2577548 Jul 12 '13 at 19:16
show 1 more comment

double cannot be dereferenced comes from the "I'm not sure how it even makes it this far" issue of your Integers.

First, you declare a to be a double[]. Then, you assign each value in a to be an Integer. I'm guessing that the language might be transparently converting it back to double for you, but I'm not sure on that one.

Your error comes from the part where you wrote a[ mid ].compareTo( x ). a is a double[]. Thus, a[mid] is a double. doubles are not objects, and thus cannot be "dereferenced". using the .compareTo() method is attempting exactly that. It would be similar to writing 9.compareTo(7).

I would suggest not using the Integer or Double classes for this case, and just using straight arithmetic:

        if( a[ mid ] < x )
            low = mid + 1;
        else if( a[ mid ] > x)
            high = mid - 1;

As for your main loop, try

public static void main( String[] args)
{
    int SIZE = 6;
    double[] a = {-3,5,10,10.5,24,45.3};

    System.out.println("Found 45.3 at " + binarySearch(a, 45.3 ));
}

Although you will need to sort a (as I did by hand, or with a sort() method) for a binary search to work properly.

share|improve this answer
    
Good explanation though I'm not sure I completely agree with not ever using Integer or Double, but I'm a noob -what do I know? :-/ –  inquisitor Jul 12 '13 at 19:17
    
I was about to indignantly respond "For this case, not in general; they have a number of legitimate uses", and then I noticed that I did use the word 'ever'. Editing for clarity now. -- It appears I meant to type 'even', not 'ever'. 'even' makes much more sense in context. –  zebediah49 Jul 12 '13 at 19:23
    
Ahh.. that makes much more sense haha! –  inquisitor Jul 12 '13 at 19:25
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.