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There are 3 (which I know) ways to suppress the "unused variable" warning. Any particular way is better than other ?

First

- (void)testString:(NSString *)testString
{
     (void)testString;
}

Second

- (void)testString:(NSString *)__unused testString
{

}

Third

- (void)testString:(NSString *)testString
{
    #pragma unused(testString)
}
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5  
-Wno-unused-variable –  user529758 Jul 12 '13 at 19:04
4  
Delete or comment out the unused parts. –  Lee Meador Jul 12 '13 at 19:05
5  
The first one, casting to void is the most portable and more idiomatic way. –  ouah Jul 12 '13 at 19:08
2  
There's also #pragma clang diagnostic push #pragma clang diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-variable" <#unused variables#> #pragma clang diagnostic pop –  Josh Caswell Jul 12 '13 at 19:08
    
Check stackoverflow.com/questions/2286312/… –  ott-- Jul 12 '13 at 22:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is the approach I use: cross platform macro for silencing unused variables warning

It allows you to use one macro for any platform (although the definitions may differ, depending on the compiler), so it's a very portable approach to express your intention to popular compilers for C based languages. On GCC and Clang, it is equivalent of wrapping your third example (#pragma unused(testString)) into a macro.

Using the example from the linked answer:

- (void)testString:(NSString *)testString
{
    MONUnusedParameter(testString);
}

I've found this approach best for portability and clarity, in use with some pretty large C, C++, ObjC, and ObjC++ codebases.

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1  
I like the idea. I hate left indent #pragma by doing this we can solve that problem as well. –  AAV Jul 12 '13 at 22:16
1  
@AmitVyawahare haha - i do, too :) –  justin Jul 12 '13 at 22:17

One way to do it is just to assign a variable pointlessly after it is declared For example:

int foo;
foo = 0;

This should suppress the unused variable warning. It is just a pointless assignment.
But otherwise I would agree with ouah, the first method is the most reliable, if you must choose from those three.

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1  
You shouldn't allocate more memory than you need just to suppress a warning. –  ozgurv Jan 20 at 14:49
    
This is likely to be confusing to anyone who reads your code later. –  bdesham Mar 7 at 3:30

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