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void myfun1(char *str) {
push ebp
mov ebp,esp
char buffer[16];
sub esp,0x18
strcpy(buffer, str);
mov eax,DWORDPTR [ebp+8]
mov DWORD PTR [esp+4],eax
lea eax,[ebp-16]
mov DWORD PTR [esp],eax
call 0x80482c4 <strcpy@plt>
myfun2(buffer);
lea eax,[ebp-16]
mov DWORD PTR [esp],eax
call 0x80483b4 <myfun2>
}
leave
ret

If any of you can please also explain this code for me .. im a begginer in assembly ..

share|improve this question
1  
looks like string copy to me. copies the string to the specified buffer. And isn't this C with assembly mixed in, not pure assembly? – Gray Jul 12 '13 at 19:59
    
yes it's mixed with C.. you're right ! – Rebecca Jul 12 '13 at 20:02
    
Which compiler is this working on? Visual? Digital ? – huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 12 '13 at 20:02
1  
yes it is GCC ... – Rebecca Jul 12 '13 at 20:08
3  
Looks more like a disassembly of the function – Andreas Fester Jul 12 '13 at 20:12

This is just showing the assembly code produced by a C function. If you comment out the lines that are C, and add some line breaks inbetween, it becomes much clearer what is going on.

// void myfun1(char *str) {
push ebp
mov ebp,esp

// char buffer[16];
sub esp,0x18                  // Allocate space for buffer and function args.

// strcpy(buffer, str);
mov eax,DWORDPTR [ebp+8]      // Load the str parameter into eax.
mov DWORD PTR [esp+4],eax     // Set str as the second argument to strcpy.
lea eax,[ebp-16]              // Load the address of the buffer into eax.
mov DWORD PTR [esp],eax       // Set the address as the first argument to strcpy.
call 0x80482c4 <strcpy@plt>   // Call strcpy.

// myfun2(buffer);
lea eax,[ebp-16]              // Load the address of the buffer into eax.
mov DWORD PTR [esp],eax       // Set the address as the first argument to myfunc.
call 0x80483b4 <myfun2>       // Call myfunc.

// }
leave
ret

This is a bit different from how I would expect C code typically to be generated. You would usually push arguments onto the stack before calling a function, whereas this code has made space on the stack in advance, and then moved the arguments onto the stack.

To better understand the ebp and esp references, it helps to construct what the stack looks like.

       ebp+08  The str parameter
       ebp+04  The return address
       ebp+00  The saved copy of ebp            <- ebp
       ebp-04  Space for buffer
       ebp-08  Space for buffer
       ebp-12  Space for buffer
       ebp-16  Space for buffer
esp+04 ebp-20  Second function argument
esp+00 ebp-24  First function argument          <- esp

When the function is called, the str parameter is pushed onto the stack, plus the return address of the calling code. The function then saves a copy of ebp, and sets ebp to point to that position on the stack. Finally it makes space for the buffer (16 bytes) plus and the two arguments used in the function calls (another 8 bytes).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot James, that was really helpful =) – Rebecca Jul 12 '13 at 20:51
    
how did you know that DWORDPTR [ebp+8] is the str? – Rebecca Jul 12 '13 at 20:57
    
Updated my answer showing how the stack is used. – James Holderness Jul 12 '13 at 21:17
    
yeah i got it now .. thanks a looot ! =D – Rebecca Jul 12 '13 at 21:44

This appears to be C code with assembly mixed in line-by-line doing exactly what the previous line said. Note that this does not make any sense to do this this way. One of the languages should be commented out.

void myfun1(char *str) {        //C
    push ebp                    //ASM
    mov ebp,esp                 //-
    char buffer[16];            //C
    sub esp,0x18                //ASM
    strcpy(buffer, str);        //C
    mov eax,DWORDPTR [ebp+8]    //ASM
    mov DWORD PTR [esp+4],eax   //-
    lea eax,[ebp-16]            //-
    mov DWORD PTR [esp],eax     //-
    call 0x80482c4 <strcpy@plt> //-
    myfun2(buffer);             //C
    lea eax,[ebp-16]            //ASM
    mov DWORD PTR [esp],eax     //-
    call 0x80483b4 <myfun2>     //-
}                               //C
leave                           //ASM
ret                             //-
share|improve this answer
    
Im studying for my exam, and this code was written by my doctor and im trying to figure out what does it mean, and still didn't get the point out of it.. so i need someone who can explain this to me .. thanks in advance to all.. – Rebecca Jul 12 '13 at 20:23

The original C function is:

void myfun1(char *str) {
   char buffer[16];
   strcpy(buffer, str);
   myfun2(buffer);
}

The assembly you see around the statements is simply what is produced by the compiler for each of the statements. For example, calling myfun2 with myfun2(buffer) produces the following assembly instructions:

lea eax,[ebp-16]            ; load the address of buffer (local variable at ebp-16) into eax
mov DWORD PTR [esp],eax     ; "push" the address on the stack as parameter - stack pointer has already been adjusted earlier
call 0x80483b4 <myfun2>     ; call the function

Such output can be produced by disassemblers, provided that the compiled code has enough information to map the assembly statements back to the source code lines.

share|improve this answer
    
If you are good at assembly, can you please explain the assembly language lines in this code for me line by line .. thanks ! – Rebecca Jul 12 '13 at 20:28
    
Give me a second ... – Andreas Fester Jul 12 '13 at 20:29
    
okay.. =) take your time, i'm waiting – Rebecca Jul 12 '13 at 20:30
    
Ok, i have documented the sample from my answer - in general, you need to get familiar especially with the stack and with the stack frame concept to understand how parameters are passed to a function. Google for stack frame and base pointer. – Andreas Fester Jul 12 '13 at 20:33
    
yeah, im familiar with the stack frames and base pointers.. and i almost understand what you've explain to me!.. thanks a lot ! – Rebecca Jul 12 '13 at 20:36

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