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I have two tables

create table tblchildinfo
  (id int, name varchar(50), 
   pickuppointid int, dropdownpointid int)

and

create table tblpoint(pointid int, PointName varchar(50))

So I have primary table tblpoint and child table as tblchildinfo and i want to write a statement such that i will get child id, child name, pickuppointID, pickuppointName, dropdownpointId & dropdownpoint name

Using SQL Server

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted
select c.id, c.name, p.name, p.pointid, p2.pointid, p2.name
from tblchildinfo c
join tblpoint p on c.pickuppointid = p.pointid
join tblpoint p2 on c.dropdownpointid = p2.pointid
where <Insert where clause>

should do you.

share|improve this answer
    
I want pickupPointName And PickUpPointId too :) – hrishi Nov 19 '09 at 10:42
    
I've added that in. You just add a selector for each of the fields you want. The join ensures that fields from both tables are available. – Jimmeh Nov 19 '09 at 10:45
    
I appreciate ur help buddy...but i want dropdownpoint name too... ie out put with two different name and two diffrent Ids tnx – hrishi Nov 19 '09 at 10:51
1  
I've editted it for you. It works, but i'm not sure it's good practice to use joins like that :) – Jimmeh Nov 19 '09 at 11:00
    
You might need left joins on both of those if you can't guarantee that the parent record will have both – HLGEM Nov 19 '09 at 18:04

Use a conditional query over two tables or use a LEFT JOIN on tblpoint. Btw, for readability i sugguest using unserscores for 'multi-word-name' tables, such as tbl_child_info and tbl_point.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate ur help buddy...but i want dropdownpoint name too... ie out put with two different name and two diffrent Ids tnx – hrishi Nov 19 '09 at 10:52
    
While the tbl prefix is useless, the use of under_scores vs. CamelCase for readability is totally subjective. I prefer CamelCase in table names, but that is because I find them easier to read and type than underscores. YMMV. – Aaron Bertrand Nov 19 '09 at 14:09

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