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Is there a complete documentation of each libraries for the C language ? As we can find for Java.

Where do you search when you want to know all the functions in a library such as math.h and how to use these functions ?

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I just use google. –  Drew McGowen Jul 12 '13 at 20:45

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I typically reference http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/ but there are other website that provide similar documentation.

On the above link, first find the library you are interested in (ex: stdio.h) http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/

If you scroll down you can see: Functions, Macros, and Types defined inside this header file.

Overall the C standard library is much smaller than what you get with Java. Here is a high level overview
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_standard_library

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Thanks for your links and explanations. That's what I was looking for :) (the C standard library is indeed much smaller than Java classes !) –  Seeven Byakko Jul 12 '13 at 21:19

I have used the GNU C Library Reference Manual and this website. They pretty much cover all the library functions, both include examples.

There are also manpages in *NIX(Linux and Unix and other Unix-like) systems if you need information about specific functions without opening up your browser. For example, if you are looking for information about the function getline() you would type man 3 getline in the Terminal. The man command is the name of executable for the manpages application. The number 3 means you are looking for a library function and getline is the name of function of your interest.

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Thanks for your links and the tip for Linux, I tried it on Debian. –  Seeven Byakko Jul 12 '13 at 21:20

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