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I am bit confused about what data should a DTO contain. For example let's assume that we have two tables: User, and Orders. Orders table contains id_users, which is foreign key to user table.

Obviously I have two DAOs, MysqlUserDao and MysqlOrdersDao, with crud operations, and two transfer objects User, and Order, in which I store jdbc rowset.

If I want to get the list of users and for each user all his orders how should I do:

1) In my MysqlUserDao create a function: getUsersAndOrders(select users.,orders. from users join orders) And my User DTO should have a OrderList property in where i put orders ?

2) In my MysqlUserDao i create a function getAllUsers(select * from users), and foreach user I use MysqlOrdersDao function getOrder(id_user);

And some clarifications:

1) For each table in database I need to create a DAO object? or just for complex ones? For example products and images, should be 2 dao or just one?

2) a DTO object should have only properties and setter getter, or it is possible to have other methods like convertEuroToUsd etc.

thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your scenario #1 is the best option because #2 generates too much overhead.

1) In my MysqlUserDao create a function: getUsersAndOrders(select users.,orders. from users join orders) And my User DTO should have a OrderList property in where i put orders ?

Clarifications: 1: If your database has a good Design, then a DAO for each table is a good approach. There some cases where you can merge DAOs together (e.g: inheritance).

2: Yes. It should be a plain bean (or POJO if you want). I suggest creating another layer where you can define your workflow. I've seem people calling this extra layer as model, sometimes DataManager, sometimes just Manager.

For instance: When creating a order you should insert a record in Order table and also insert a record in the Notification table (because end users will be notified via email every time a order is created)

class OrderManager {
   private OrderDAO oDao;
   private NotificationDao nDao;

   public saveOrder(OrderDTO o) {
      Long orderId = oDao.save(o);
      NotificationDTO n = new NotificationDTO();
      n.setType(NotificationType.ORDER_CREATED);
      n.setEntityId(orderId);
      nDao.save(n);
   }
}

UPDATE: In most cases we can say that:

  • "Managers" may handle many DAOs;
  • DAOs should not contain other DAOs and are tied to a DTO;
  • DTOs can contain other DTOs

There is an important idea of LAZY or EAGER load when it comes to handling collections. But this is another subject :D

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In your example I understand the purpose of OrderManager, but If I have a simple DAO with just crud operations then Manager is pointless, i think. An insert function in manager would look like this: ` public insertOrder(OrderDto o ) { oDao.insert(o)); } ` . As a rule a transfer object should contain all other DTO that are in join relation? like orm does –  Catalin Jul 13 '13 at 11:04
    
@Catalin "As a rule a transfer object should contain all other DTO that are in join relation?". I would say that it depends, we can not define such strong rule, there many performance (if you do not join, means that you need to loop and perform many other selects later) and semantic (is User an intrinsic component of an Order?) issues that you need to think about. –  Yori Kusanagi Jul 13 '13 at 12:18

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