Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a Ruby project I'm working on, I add ActiveRecord-style, MVC functionality to model classes with a mixin architecture similar to the following:

module Model

  # Classes that mixin this module gain ActiveRecord-style class methods
  # like Model.all, Model.first, Model.last et al.
  #
  # Throughout this module, @@database_bridge will contain a reference to a
  # database ORM bridge, that does the dirty implementation of these methods.

  def all
    # Implementation stuff here, using @@database_bridge as appropriate
  end

  def first
    ...
  end

  # et al

end


class ExampleModel

  extend Model

  # Model-specific implementation goes here...

end

Calling e = ExampleModel.first would assign the first ExampleModel in the database to e.

I want to use dependency injection to set @@database_bridge at runtime, such that every class containing extend Model uses the same, specified ORM object.

How can I do this?

If I could write some kind of helper method to set up that class variable on demand, that would be great.

share|improve this question
    
If anyone is thinking I'd be better inheriting stuff from a base 'Model' class, that really doesn't fit with my class hierarchy. The framework isn't MVC at its core, it simply uses MVC-style class methods as an elegant way to pull stuff from the database. –  ChasingTheJames Jul 12 '13 at 21:54
add comment

2 Answers

This isn't the answer, but is a potential solution: you can call class_variable_set on a module, by calling Module.class_variable_set.

Thus, you could create a helper method, in an appropriate namespace somewhere, that calls Module.class_variable_set :@@class_var, "new value".

For the example above, my helper function would like this:

def set_database_bridge(new_bridge)
  Model.class_variable_set :@@database_bridge, new_bridge
end

This solution creates a degree of coupling between the helper function and the implementation of the Model mixin, as if the name of @@database_bridge were to change, the helper function would break.

If anyone has an idea for a more loosely coupled/more encapsulated solution (where we perhaps encapsulate the helper function within Model somewhere), that would be awesome!

share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've found a better solution than the previous, and it's much simpler than I thought (d'oh!): by prefixing a method with self. in a mixin module, a public interface to that method via Module.method becomes available.

Thus, we simply add a setter to our module, using a self.attribute_set statement.

In the above example, the above approach would yield the following code:

module Model

  # Classes that mixin this module gain ActiveRecord-style class methods
  # like Model.all, Model.first, Model.last et al.
  #
  # Throughout this module, @@database_bridge will contain a reference to a
  # database ORM bridge, that does the dirty implementation of these methods.

  def all
    # Implementation stuff here, using @@database_bridge as appropriate
  end

  def first
    ...
  end

  def self.set_database_bridge(ref_to_new_bridge)
    @@database_bridge = ref_to_new_bridge
    ## any additional intialisation/sanitisation logic goes here
  end

  # et al

end


class ExampleModel

  extend Model

  # Model-specific implementation goes here...

end

Calling Model.set_database_bridge would allow us to pass in a new database bridge.

If we don't actually need any initialisation or sanitisation logic in our helper function, there is another, more elegant approach - add an attr_accessor within a class << self block, thus:

module Model

  # ...

  class << self
    attr_accessor :database_bridge
  end

end

This way, we can call Ruby's standard setter method: Model.database_bridge = the_new_bridge.

Sweet.

share|improve this answer
    
This is really the answer I was looking for, and will tick it tomorrow, if no one has any specific 'gotchas' for this approach. Comments and suggestions appreciated! –  ChasingTheJames Jul 13 '13 at 14:57
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.