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I am trying to create 30 pairs of integers, with each integer randomly drawn from a finite set, with no duplicate pairs.

So for instance, the integers 1 - 10 can be paired in (I think...) 45 different ways, without creating duplicate pairs: <1,2> <1,3> <1,4> <1,5> <1,6> <1,7> <1,8> <1,9> <1,10> <2,3> <2,4>, ad naseum. Doing this sequentially with a nested for-loop would be easy (like what was discussed here), however this would produce the same pairings each trial, with no variety or randomness.

The sets could be as large as 10,000 integers, so creating all possible permutations, then randomly drawing from that set, would be impractical. Only 30 pairs will be drawn each trial. I'm writing this in Java, but any language would do, provided the functionality could be ported. Any tips would be great.

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closed as off-topic by Brian Roach, rgettman, Mario, Mark, mpapis Jul 13 '13 at 4:41

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1  
You choose to generate randomly and accessing sequentially instead of generating sequentially and accessing randomly? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 12 '13 at 22:02
    
We could generate sequentially and access randomly, but once the set of integers becomes very large, this would likely be impractical. –  Chance Jul 12 '13 at 22:03
1  
When you say no duplicate pairs, is it acceptable that pull <1,2> and <2,1>? Or is that not allowed? –  corsiKa Jul 12 '13 at 22:03
    
Then how can you check if a pair was not generated before(with O(1))? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 12 '13 at 22:05
    
@corsiKa No, that wouldn't be allowed. I lack the appropriate terminology, but those two pairings produces the same set. –  Chance Jul 12 '13 at 22:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first think you need to do is to have an index-mapping. Let's say your alphabet was fibinoci numbers less than 30 (1,2,3,5,8,13,21), and that you need 5 pairings. The first thing we need to do is map these to indexes 0 .. n. For this purpose, we can use an array or a List or something.

int[] mapping = { 1,2,3,5,8,13,21 };

Next, we need a container class

class Pair {
    int a;
    int b;
    Pair(int a, int b) { this.a = a; this.b = b; }
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if(o instanceof Pair) {
            Pair p = (Pair)o;
            if(a == p.a && b == p.b) return true;
            // check reverse, as per comment from @Chance
            if(a == p.b && b == p.a) return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
    // poor hashcode, for sure, but we need hash(a,b) == hash(b,a)...
    public int hashCode() { return a ^ b; }
}

Now, we can use a random number generator to create them based on our mappings:

Random rand = new Random(); // in the class or something?
Set<Pair> generatePairs(int[] alphabet, int num) {
    Set<Pair> set = new HashSet<>();
    int size = alphabet.length * alphabet.length; // pretend it's a matrix 
    while(set.size() < num) {
        int both = random.nextInt(size); // only works up to alphabet.length < 2^15
        int apos = both % alphabet.length;
        int bpos = both / alphabet.length;
        int a = alphabet[a];
        int b = alphabet[b];
        Pair pair = new Pair(a,b);
        set.add(pair);
    }
    return set;
}

I put together a complete runnable example:

c:\files\j>javac Uniques.java

c:\files\j>java Uniques
Pair (5,5)
Pair (13,13)
Pair (7,7)
Pair (17,19)
Pair (7,2)
Pair (17,23)
Pair (11,3)
Pair (23,29)
Pair (29,17)
Pair (11,5)
Pair (19,2)
Pair (13,29)
Pair (3,17)
Pair (23,5)
Pair (2,23)
Pair (7,19)
Pair (5,19)
Pair (29,5)
Pair (13,17)
Pair (13,19)

Source code:

import java.util.*;
class Uniques {

    static class Pair {
        int a;
        int b;
        Pair(int a, int b) { this.a = a; this.b = b; }
        public boolean equals(Object o) {
            if(o instanceof Pair) {
                Pair p = (Pair)o;
                if(a == p.a && b == p.b) return true;
                // check reverse, as per comment from @Chance
                if(a == p.b && b == p.a) return true;
            }
            return false;
        }
        // poor hashcode, for sure, but we need hash(a,b) == hash(b,a)...
        public int hashCode() { return a ^ b; }
        public String toString() { return "Pair (" + a + "," + b + ")"; }
    }

    static Random rand = new Random(); // in the class or something?
    static Set<Pair> generatePairs(int[] alphabet, int num) {
        Set<Pair> set = new HashSet<Pair>();
        int size = alphabet.length * alphabet.length; // pretend it's a matrix 
        while(set.size() < num) {
            int both = rand.nextInt(size); // only works up to alphabet.length < 2^15
            int apos = both % alphabet.length;
            int bpos = both / alphabet.length;
            int a = alphabet[apos];
            int b = alphabet[bpos];
            Pair pair = new Pair(a,b);
            set.add(pair);
        }
        return set;
    }

    public static void main(String...args) {
        int[] nums = new int[10];
        int p = 2;
        // seed with prime numbers up to 10000
        for(int i = 0; i < nums.length; i++) {
            while(!isPrime(p)) p++;
            nums[i] = p++;
        }
        // just double checking I don't suck at isPrime() haha
        //for(int i : nums) System.out.println(i);

        // okay we have our numbers, now let's get some stuff out of them
        Set<Pair> pairs = generatePairs(nums, 20);
        for(Pair pair : pairs) System.out.println(pair);
    }

    public static boolean isPrime(int p) {
        if(p == 2) return true;
        if(p % 2 == 0) return false;
        int q = (int)(Math.sqrt(p) + 1);
        for(int i = 3; i < q; i +=2) {
            if(p % i == 0) return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

}
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1  
I have a few typos in the first blocks of code. That was made without a compiler or anything, just off the top of my head. The final block of code compiles and runs. –  corsiKa Jul 12 '13 at 22:25
1  
I tweaked the size of the alphabet and number generated, and this code generates over a million unique pairs from an alphabet of 30000 in under a second on my laptop. –  corsiKa Jul 12 '13 at 22:28
    
Wow. Thanks dude, I owe you a beer! –  Chance Jul 12 '13 at 22:37
1  
Hey np. There are about a million optimizations you can make to this, most of which are trivial. For example, you can make two calls to nextInt() if your size is > 2^15 if you have to, and other stuff like that, probably could make a better hashCode function, as there's probably a lot of collisions here. (A better hashcode would be something like int lowest = a; int highest = b; if(a>b) { lowest=b; highest=a; } return (lowest << 14) ^ highest; } –  corsiKa Jul 12 '13 at 22:40

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