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Recently, I've been developing a C++11 library, and I've come to use this pattern a couple times, where the class that is actually going to be exposed to the user determines its inherited classes based on the contained type. I reproduced here the va_if variadic metafunction I use to accomplish this, but this could be accomplished with boost::mpl::if_c or std::conditional as well.

template<typename bool_type, typename result_type, typename... Ts>
struct va_if;

template<typename result_type, typename... Ts>
struct va_if<std::true_type, result_type, Ts...>
{
  typedef result_type type;
};

template<typename result_type, typename... Ts>
struct va_if<std::false_type, result_type, Ts...>
{
  typedef typename va_if<Ts...>::type type;
};

template<typename T>
class container_base { /* Generic container functions */ };

template<typename T>
class container_integral_base
  : public container_base<T>
{ /* Code tailored to integral types */ };

template<typename T>
class container_floating_point_base
  : public container_base<T>
{ /* Code tailored to floating point types */ };

// This class chooses the class it should inherit from at compile time...    
template<typename T>
class Container
  : public va_if<std::is_integral<T>::type, container_integral_base<T>,
                 std::is_floating_point<T>::type, container_floating_point_base<T>>::type
{ /* public interface code */ };

What I'm wondering is, does this pattern of compile-time determination of inheritance have a name?

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A serious downside to the above is that counterfactual bases get instantantiated. I guess their methods do not get called: still, a downside. –  Yakk Jul 12 '13 at 23:24
    
I ended up using template specialization like the accepted answer, but used std::enable_if to avoid using the enumeration. @Yakk would this still cause a bunch of counterfactual instantiations? –  Bradley Swain Jul 25 '13 at 17:43
    
The accepted answer does not have the same kind of "counterfactual instantiations" problem of the above. (basically a name made up for "types which should be disabled by some compile time check, but are instantiated" -- your va_if's ever second argument would be instantiated, but only the one matching would be used, hence "counterfactual" ones would be instantiated...) –  Yakk Jul 25 '13 at 18:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think I have seen that pattern used with variadic templates before, although a similar approach used with specialization can be seen in multiple libraries:

enum container_type { generic, arithmetic, floating_point };

template <container_type, typename T>
struct container_base {                   // generic
//...
};
template <typename T>
struct container_base<arithmetic,T> {     // replaces container_integral_base
//...
};
template <typename T>
struct container_base<floating_point,T> { // replaces container_floating_point_base
//...
};

Still no name for it, but I would consider replacing your unnamed pattern with this other unnamed more common pattern that you can concisely describe as inheriting from an specialization

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