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This question is a followup to Is there a standard way to swap a query from an ID to a different column like 'name'?

This query works fine:

    SELECT manufacturers.id, manufacturers.name, models.model_manufacturer, models.model_part
    FROM models 
    INNER JOIN manufacturers 
    ON manufacturers.id = models.model_manufacturer
    WHERE model_part = (
        SELECT parts.id 
        FROM parts 
        WHERE parts.name = '{$part_name}')
    GROUP BY manufacturers.id
    ORDER BY name ASC

But this one, when it encounters a manufacturer who has more than a single model, fails with "Subquery returns more than 1 row":

SELECT parts.id, models.id, models.model_part, models.model_manufacturer, models.name, models.year, models.weight
    FROM parts
    INNER JOIN models
    ON parts.id = models.model_part
    WHERE model_manufacturer = (
        SELECT manufacturers.id 
        FROM manufacturers 
        WHERE manufacturers.name = '{$manufacturer_name}') 
    && model_part = (
        SELECT parts.id 
        FROM parts 
        WHERE parts.name = '{$part_name}')

What I'm not really understanding is if I run just the subquery in the working example, or either subquery individually in the second example, they all return a single value. And if I run either whole query, they both return multiple values. So why does one error and the other doesn't? It works fine running the query in myPHPAdmin, but fails when I try to do it in my PHP file.

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

But this one, when it encounters a manufacturer who has more than a single model, fails with "Subquery returns more than 1 row"

MySQL = operator can compare 1 value with another single value. When the subquery returns more, then 1 value, it gets confused, because it doesn't know, with which to compare.

Use IN operator instead of =:

SELECT parts.id, models.id, 
    models.model_part, models.model_manufacturer, 
    models.name, models.year, models.weight
FROM parts
INNER JOIN models
ON parts.id = models.model_part
WHERE model_manufacturer = (
        SELECT manufacturers.id 
        FROM manufacturers 
        WHERE manufacturers.name = '{$manufacturer_name}') 
    && model_part IN (
        SELECT parts.id 
        FROM parts 
        WHERE parts.name = '{$part_name}')

Sorry, if I put IN operator to incorrect position. But I think, the 2-nd subquery for the model_part is the correct place.

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This is still returning the same error for me. If I understand what you're saying about the = operator though, shouldn't it work in my original 2nd example if both SELECT manufacturers.id FROM manufacturers WHERE manufacturers.name = '{$manufacturer_name}' and SELECT parts.id FROM parts WHERE parts.name = '{$part_name}' have a single result, which they do? The original query that worked fine was just WHERE model_manufacturer = {$manufacturer_id} && model_part = {$part_id}. I'm just trying to use the 'name' column for results instead. –  ryansommers Jul 12 '13 at 22:57
    
I'm really sorry, these queries weren't the ones causing the error. I did more testing and discovered it was a separate query that comes right after the one I thought it was. Total newb error on my part. Fortunately, your suggestion of using IN worked :) –  ryansommers Jul 12 '13 at 23:19
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Above suggestion of IN is probably the easiest idea.

I would be tempted to recode it as JOINs though, using a DISTINCT to remove the duplicates:-

SELECT DISTINCT parts.id, models.id, models.model_part, models.model_manufacturer, models.name, models.year, models.weight
    FROM parts
    INNER JOIN models
    ON parts.id = models.model_part
    INNER JOIN manufacturers
    ON models.model_manufacturer = manufacturers.id AND manufacturers.name = '{$manufacturer_name}'
    INNER JOIN parts parts2 ON models.model_part = parts2.id AND parts.name = '{$part_name}'
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Is the reason you'd be tempted because the INNER JOINS will be faster? I'm only unsure of what "INNER JOIN parts parts2" is doing exactly. Is parts2 an alias of some sort? –  ryansommers Jul 12 '13 at 23:23
    
They can be. Using selects like the ones you have tend to only cause issues when they are correlated sub selects (ie, they depend on a value from outside the select), and I tend to avoid them to avoid ever using a correlated one by mistake. As it is joining against the parts table twice I have used an alias for the 2nd one of parts2. –  Kickstart Jul 13 '13 at 12:43
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