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I have a div (parent) that contains another div (child). Parent is the first element in body with no particular CSS style. When I set

.child
{
    margin-top: 10px;
}

The end result is that top of my child is still aligned with parent. Instead of child being shifted for 10px downwards, my parent moves 10px down.

My DOCTYPE is set to XHTML Transitional.

What am I missing here?

edit 1
My parent needs to have strictly defined dimensions because it has a background that has to be displayed under it from top to bottom (pixel perfect). So setting vertical margins on it is a no go.

edit 2
This behaviour is the same on FF, IE as well as CR.

share|improve this question
    
On few browsers or only one specific one? –  o.k.w Nov 19 '09 at 11:09
    
@o.k.w - see my edit 2. –  Robert Koritnik Nov 19 '09 at 11:26
3  
This is expected behaviour and is defined in the specification. –  anddoutoi Nov 19 '09 at 12:19
    
THANKS! you're da man! –  rahmanisback Oct 19 '11 at 8:05
17  
this behavior makes no sense what so ever. Margin is suppose to stay inside the parent. Not move the parent. Who writes these rules. –  Muhammad Umer Mar 14 '13 at 14:45

8 Answers 8

up vote 165 down vote accepted

Found an alternative at Child elements with margins within DIVs You can also add:

.parent { overflow: auto; }

or:

.parent { overflow: hidden; }

This prevents the margins to collapse. Border and padding do the same. Hence, you can also use the following to prevent a top-margin collapse:

.parent {
    padding-top: 1px;
    margin-top: -1px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
does this work in all major browsers? –  Tom Nov 18 '11 at 17:24
    
@Tom Fitton: without it, much sites would not work. This is a real essential cornerstone of the CSS standard, so you can expect it to work. –  vdboor Nov 19 '11 at 10:33
9  
.parent { overflow: auto; } works great –  Jay Dave Oct 15 '12 at 16:12
10  
i wanna know why does this happen what good this does to anyone. What situation this 'feature' was meant to be. –  Muhammad Umer Mar 14 '13 at 14:47
4  
Could you give some example. Let say i have div as background. With h1, h2 and p in it. Now i want to move h1 down a bit so it's not so near to the above edge of background div, yet not expand the h1 element itself. I'd think add top margin. Which is obvious. but when i do that, the glorious background decides to move down with it. How this is a feature. How this helps in spacing between h1,h2, and p. Help me see what you are saying. –  Muhammad Umer Mar 17 '13 at 19:24

This is normal behaviour (among browser implementations at least). Margin does not affect the child's position in relation to its parent, unless the parent has padding, in which case most browsers will then add the child's margin to the parent's padding.

To get the behaviour you want, you need:

.child {
    margin-top: 0;
}

.parent {
    padding-top: 10px;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Adding border to the parent will effect the child's margin too, try .parent {border: solid 1px;} –  o.k.w Nov 19 '09 at 11:17
3  
Thanks man. I found it in the spec: w3.org/TR/CSS2/box.html –  Robert Koritnik Nov 19 '09 at 12:50
1  
The margin doesn't add to the padding... it applies separately. But the visual effect is the same. –  Brilliand May 26 '11 at 22:27
    
What if you want a top-margin…? Not really a solution. –  feeela Jun 16 '11 at 18:44
2  
Like feeela said - this isn't really a solution if a top margin is required. vdboor's answer suits better. –  Joey Morani Apr 7 '12 at 23:07

the parent element has not to be empty at least put   before the child element.

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yes, sometimes only this can help... or better put something like this: <div style='width:0;height:0'>&nbsp;</div> –  Pigalev Pavel Oct 6 '13 at 13:51

I had this problem too but preferred to prevent negative margins hacks, so I put a

<div class="supercontainer"></div>

around it all which has paddings instead of margins. Of course this means more divitis but it's probably the cleanest way to do get this done properly.

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The margin of the elements contained within .child are collapsing.

<html>
<style type="text/css" media="screen">
    #parent {background:#dadada;}
    #child {background:red; margin-top:17px;}
</style>
<body>
<div id="parent">

    <p>&amp;</p>

    <div id="child">
        <p>&amp;</p>	
    </div>

</div>
</body>
</html>

In this example, p is receiving a margin from the browser default styles. Browser default font-size is typically 16px. By having a margin-top of more than 16px on #child you start to notice it's position move.

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interestingly my favorite solution to this problem isn't yet mentioned here: using floats.

html:

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child"></div>
</div>

css:

.parent{width:100px; height:100px;}
.child{float:left; margin-top:20px; width:50px; height:50px;}

see it here: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/Iphol

note that in case you need dynamic height on the parent, it also has to float, so simply replace height:100px; by float:left;

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This is what worked for me

.parent {
padding-top: 1px;
margin-top: -1px;
}

.child {
margin-top:260px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/97fzwuxh/

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Using top instead of margin-top is another possible solution, if appropriate.

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