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I have this code defined.

public class AAA {
    public static final Map<String, String> gList = new HashMap<> {{
        put("xxx", "xxx");
        put ....
    }};
    public static AAA instance;
    public static AAA getInstance() {
        if (instance == null)
            instance = new AAA();
        return instance;
    }

    public String calledFunc(String k) {
        return gList.get(k);    
    }
}

public class BBB {
    ...
    public void callingFunc(String k) {
        AAA.getInstance().calledFunc(k);  // <=  NULL pointer some time
    }
}

Is this because memory allocation failure or it will be freed some where. Just don't understand what wrong in my code. Maybe this is not reliable way to initialize.

share|improve this question
    
You didn't declare the type of instance. –  thatJavaNerd Jul 13 '13 at 1:24
5  
You need to synchronize the getInstance() method. –  EJP Jul 13 '13 at 1:26
    
Very good point. It will guarantee only one instance. –  Yan Gao Jul 13 '13 at 1:37
1  
It will also solve the problem, by enforcing the necessary memory-model constraints. –  EJP Jul 13 '13 at 1:46

1 Answer 1

I tried doing something similar to this a while back for holding data between classes, I eventually went with an Enum

Try something like this perhaps?

public enum AAA {
    INSTANCE;
    public static final Map<String, String> gList = new HashMap<> {{
        put("xxx", "xxx");
        put ....
    }};
    public String calledFunc(String k) {
        return gList.get(k);
    }
}

If you did this, you wouldn't really need the function in the Enum since you could just do

public class BBB {
    ...
    public void callingFunc(String k) {
        AAA.gList.get(k);  // <=  NULL pointer some time
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This my pretty confused part in java to use enum. So what could be difference between enum and class? Is the way to do initialize? –  Yan Gao Jul 13 '13 at 1:48
    
When using an Enum, you only allow one instance to be created, and that's typically done when you start the program. The difference between a class and an Enum is that a class can be instantiated multiple times (xxx = new AAA();) unless you specifically make it so you can only create one instance. In simple terms, Enums are kind of just a cleaner and easier way to make a single instance of a class that can be used to share data, information and even methods across other classes. (That's from my understanding, but I could be wrong at some parts) –  IAreKyleW00t Jul 13 '13 at 1:57
    
Thanks for explain. There could be more but this is the most important idea to know. –  Yan Gao Jul 13 '13 at 2:18
    
Here's something you can look at; it gives some great info on Enums: Java Enums –  IAreKyleW00t Jul 13 '13 at 2:38

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