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What are the effects of incorrectly setting the netmask? I have a C++ application that sets the network mask of a device. If the netmask is set incorrectly, tftp doesn't seem to work properly. Why would this happen? What other problems occur when the netmask is not properly set for a device/PC?

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Whoever downvoted please leave comment for downvote. I would like to fix/explain whatever caused the downvote. Thanks. –  zooropa Nov 19 '09 at 13:09
    
@zooropa: unfortunately, it is a common practice to have "drive-by down-votes" around here... –  jldupont Nov 19 '09 at 13:25
    
I promise I won't flame/retaliate. If you leave the downvote comment as an answer below, I'll even upvote it! I think downvote comments are just as important as other comments and answers. Things can be learned from them as well! I went on meta.stackoverflow.com and saw a question about downvote comments. Jeff Atwood has a comment on it. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/135/… –  zooropa Nov 19 '09 at 16:19
    
Perhaps the downvote is due to the fact that this isn't really a programming question as such so could be considered off topic for this site. (I consider it close enough though, and it wasn't me!) –  jcoder Mar 6 '13 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

While this question is probably more about IP networks than programming it is a challenging subject for many developers.

The netmask delimits the host address (your PC or server) and the network address (the part of the logical network infrastructure in which your system lives). The two parts are used to deliver the data packet to the correct device. The network address is obtained by ANDing the netmask with the IP Address. Consider the following scenario:

IP Address: 10.0.1.1
Netmask: 255.255.0.0

The host address portion of the IP address for our PC is 1.1, so the PC knows that any host addresses starting 10.0. are local to it. Any addresses that then start 10.1, etc, are not 'local' and will need to be forwarded to a router. If you have another device intended to be on the same network that is:

IP Address: 10.0.2.1
Netmask: 255.255.255.0

Here the netmask is wrong for our example setup, this device is now going to see the network address as 10.0.2 and the host address as 1, if it tries to communicate with 10.0.1.1 it will see a network address of 10.0.1! Not local and so will refer it to the default router for forwarding. If the netmask was correctly set (i.e. the same as the first example, assuming that's the correct setting for your network) then the second device would see the first as local, i.e. on the 10.0 network and wouldn't attempt to forward the packet to a router.

Many protocols will happily cope with this but tftp is intended to operate within a single network and so will fail as there's a perception that the target is on a different network.

This may not describe your exact situation but I hope that the example demonstrates the important principle that configuration matters, you can't have an inaccurately configured environment and expect it to work.

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The netmask determines which IP adresses are local (non-routed); IP adresses outside that range go through the router. If the netmask is wrong, the program tries to directly access sites where it has to go through the router, or vice versa.

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The netmask defines, which part of the IP-address is used as address for the network and which part is used for the workstations.

First Example:

IP1: 192.168.20.4
IP2: 192.168.192.4
NM:  255.255.0.0

Both IPs are in the same net. They can communicate with each other without needing a router. That's because the IP-addresses will result in the same bitmask when you or it with the netmask.

Second Example:

IP1: 192.168.20.4
IP2: 192.168.192.4
NM:  255.255.128.0

Now both IPs are in different networks because when you or the IP-addresses with the Netmask, the resulting bitmask will be different and they wont be able to communicate with each other without a router that routes between the two networks.

You can test this by yourself with ipcalc.

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