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Why could I specialize class A, but can't specialize function sum in the same way? How do I make this code work? Thanks in advance.

template<class T>
class A
{
};

template<class T>
class A<T*>
{
};

template<class T>
T sum(const T& a, const T& b)
{
    return a + b;
}

template<class T>
T sum<T*> (const T* a, const T* b)
{
    return *a + *b;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int a = 1, b = 2;
    cout << sum<int>(&a, &b);`
    A<int> c;
    A<int*> d;
    return 0;
}
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't partialy specialize function templates, the standard forbids it. But you can simply overload it:

template<class T>
T sum(const T& a, const T& b);

template<class T>
T sum (const T* a, const T* b); // note the absence of <T*> here
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As it has already been stated, function templates cannot be partially specialized.

There are several workarounds though in situations where you really need partial specialization (instead of overload). I just wanted to add that in cases like that you can often literally implement partially specialized behavior by delegating the call to a class template

template<typename T> struct sum_impl {
  static T sum(const T& a, const T& b) {
    return a + b;
  }
};

template<typename T> struct sum_impl<T*> {
  static T sum(const T* a, const T* b) {
    return *a + *b;
  }
};

template <typename T>
T sum(const T& a, const T& b)
{
  return sum_impl<T>::sum(a, b);
}
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This worked for me:

template<typename T> typename std::enable_if<std::is_pointer<T>::value==false, T>::type sum(const T& a, const T& b)
{
  return a + b;
}

template<typename T> typename std::enable_if<std::is_pointer<T>::value, typename std::remove_pointer<T>::type>::type sum(const T a, const T b)
{
  return *a + *b;
}
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You are aware that the second will not give pointers to const (const X*) but const arguments (X* const)? Now it likely won't be a problem (because for pointers to const, T will be deduced accordingly), but may be a problem if e.g. the non-const version will call less efficient code (e.g. if the pointed-to object internally uses COW pointers and you call a method returning a reference into pointed-to data, the non-const version might first unalias the pointer, which might cause an unnecessary performance hit). –  celtschk Jul 14 '13 at 20:25
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