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I'm currently working on my first game in java and i'm trying to implement sounds when the spaceship is getting hit.. this is my code . I get a null pointer exception but my sound is in the right place "workspace/project/src/sounds/"

public class GameSounds 
 {
public static synchronized void hit()
{
    try
    {
        Clip clip = AudioSystem.getClip();
        AudioInputStream inputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(GameSounds.class.getResourceAsStream("sounds/8bit_bomb_explosion.wav"));
        clip.open(inputStream);
        clip.start(); 
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
}

here is the stacktrace

java.lang.NullPointerException
    at com.sun.media.sound.SoftMidiAudioFileReader.getAudioInputStream(Unknown Source)
    at javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(Unknown Source)
    at sound.GameSounds.hit(GameSounds.java:16)
    at main.Main.doLogic(Main.java:135)
    at main.Main.run(Main.java:101)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Unknown Source)

package sound;
import java.io.InputStream;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioInputStream;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem;
import javax.sound.sampled.Clip;
public class GameSounds 
{
    public static synchronized void hit()
    {
        try
        {
            String resPath = "/sounds/8bit_bomb_explosion.wav"; // *** this is the key ***
            InputStream audioInStream = GameSounds.class.getResourceAsStream(resPath);
            System.out.println("is audioInStream null?: " + (audioInStream == null)); // test it!
            AudioInputStream inputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(audioInStream);          Clip clip = AudioSystem.getClip();
            clip.open(inputStream);
            clip.start(); 
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

thanks for advices now it works

share|improve this question
    
Is your hit() method being called? Are you checking this with println statements? Is the clip finding the sound resource? Can you check this via println somehow (I'm not sure since I don't deal with this class)? Does your code throw exceptions? Are you taking care to call this code in a background thread and not on the Swing thread? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 13 '13 at 13:20
    
Print the stack trace of the exception and tell us which line it refers to. The stack trace tells where the problem is. Not showing it is like going to the doctor and refusing to tell where your pain is located. –  JB Nizet Jul 13 '13 at 13:23
    
I see that you've now posted that you get a NPE. This should be in the question when original asked since it is sort of critical material, this and where the NPE is thrown as per @JBNizet. And in all likelihood, you are not getting the resource with the correct path. Understand that resource paths are based on where the class loader looks to load class files and not on where the src or "user.dir" directory is. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 13 '13 at 13:24
1  
Your first attempt was almost correct. Your second one is wrong. You're loading a resource, using the class loader, which looks for resources in directories and jars placed in the classpath, and thus using paths relative to these directories and jars. Not using absolute file system paths. –  JB Nizet Jul 13 '13 at 13:38
    
Since it now works, you should accept the answer that showed you the answer, by clicking on the check mark next to the answer. That's how you say thanks here. –  JB Nizet Jul 13 '13 at 13:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In all likelihood, you are not getting the resource with the correct path. Understand that resource paths are based on where the class loader looks to load class files and not on where the src or "user.dir" directory is.

Perhaps you want to do:

// almost always better to break up a long code line into smaller lines.
String resPath = "/sounds/8bit_bomb_explosion.wav"; // *** this is the key ***
InputStream audioInStream = GameSounds.class.getResourceAsStream(resPath);
System.out.println("is audioInStream null?: " + (audioInStream == null)); // test it!
AudioInputStream inputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(audioInStream);

Again the path String will depend on where your class files are located in relation to your src directory.

share|improve this answer
    
It should simply be /sounds/8bit_bomb_explosion.wav The path should be absolute, and not relative. And ../ is not supported anyway (AFAIR) –  JB Nizet Jul 13 '13 at 13:30
    
@JBNizet: I thought that they were. OK, I changed my answer. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 13 '13 at 13:33
    
Better, but the advantage of absolute paths is precisely that they don't depend on the package of the class loading the resource. Only of the location of the loaded resource. So the last line of the answer is wrong. +1 anyway. –  JB Nizet Jul 13 '13 at 13:34

I have had the same problems. But after searching for hours I found Javazoom which is a external libery you can import into your project and makes it much more easy to play sounds: http://www.javazoom.net/index.shtml

You can use it like this:

  import javazoom.jl.player.advanced.*;

class SoundJLayer extends PlaybackListener implements Runnable
{
    private String filePath;
    private AdvancedPlayer player;
    private Thread playerThread;    

    public SoundJLayer(String filePath)
    {
        this.filePath = filePath;
    }

    public void play()
    {
        try
        {
            String urlAsString = 
                "file:///" 
                + new java.io.File(".").getCanonicalPath() 
                + "/" 
                + this.filePath;

            this.player = new AdvancedPlayer
            (
                new java.net.URL(urlAsString).openStream(),
                javazoom.jl.player.FactoryRegistry.systemRegistry().createAudioDevice()
            );

            this.player.setPlayBackListener(this);

            this.playerThread = new Thread(this, "AudioPlayerThread");

            this.playerThread.start();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void stop() {
        player.stop();
    }
    // PlaybackListener members

    public void playbackStarted(PlaybackEvent playbackEvent)
    {
    }

    public void playbackFinished(PlaybackEvent playbackEvent)
    {
    }    

    // Runnable members

    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            this.player.play();
        }
        catch (javazoom.jl.decoder.JavaLayerException ex)
        {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }

    }
}

After that you just have to create a new SoundJLayer-Object and start ir with play()

Hope this is helpful,

Jan

share|improve this answer
3  
That won't let the OP read the sound file from the classpath, which is definitely a better idea than reading it from the file system as you're doing. –  JB Nizet Jul 13 '13 at 13:31

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