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Please have a look at the following code

Declaration

vector<vector<Point>> *contours;
vector<vector<Point>> *contoursPoly;

contours = new vector<vector<Point>>();
contoursPoly = new vector<vector<Point>>();

Implementation

//Find contours
findContours(*canny,*contours,*heirarchy,CV_RETR_TREE,CV_CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE,Point(0,0));

//Draw contours
//drawContours(*current,*contours,-1,Scalar(0,0,255),2);

for(int i=0;i<contours->size();i++)
{
  cv::approxPolyDP(Mat(contours[i]),contoursPoly[i], 3, true);
}

As soon as I run this code I get the error

A first chance exception of type 'System.Runtime.InteropServices.SEHException' occurred in Automated  System.exe
An unhandled exception of type 'System.Runtime.InteropServices.SEHException' occurred in Automated System.exe

This error is coming from this code part of the code

cv::approxPolyDP(Mat(contours[i]),contoursPoly[i], 3, true);

Why am I getting this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

contoursPoly is a pointer to a vector.

contoursPoly[i] treats the pointer to the vector as an array of vectors, and gets the ith one.

You want (*contoursPoly)[i], which first dereferences the pointer. And probably the same for (*contours)[i].

In addition, it is possible that there is no reason to use a pointer-to-vector.

Replace:

vector<vector<Point>> *contours;
vector<vector<Point>> *contoursPoly;

contours = new vector<vector<Point>>();
contoursPoly = new vector<vector<Point>>();

with

vector<vector<Point>> contours;
vector<vector<Point>> contoursPoly;

then, remove the dereference *s from:

findContours(*canny,*contours,*heirarchy,CV_RETR_TREE,CV_CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE,Point(0,0));

like this:

findContours(canny,contours,*heirarchy,CV_RETR_TREE,CV_CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE,Point(0,0));

and change the std::vector<std::vector<Point>>* arguments in your functions to std::vector<std::vector<Point>>& arguments. Replace use of -> on such variables with use of ., and remove dereferencing.

Heap based allocation (ie, free store) is something you need to do only sometimes in C++. Don't do it needlessly.

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Thank you for the reply. I will check this out and let you know :) –  JustCause Jul 13 '13 at 17:20
    
Yes, This helped me. Thank you! –  JustCause Jul 14 '13 at 14:26

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