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I am a new java programmer in Eclipse for Android platform. I am working on an android app which will receive multicast data through wifi interface and display the same in a TextView. The data will be updated every 1 sec.

I have the code as below. But i am facing problem in updating the GUI.in this code the network receive and gui are done in same thread i.e. main thread that's why my application in hanging.

I had tried using AsynchTask but could not succeed because i dont know how exactly to use it.

package com.example.cdttiming;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.DatagramPacket;
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.MulticastSocket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.content.Context;
import android.net.wifi.WifiManager;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.view.Menu;
import android.widget.EditText;



public class MainActivity extends Activity
{
    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
        EditText Seconds;
        Seconds =(EditText)findViewById(R.id.Seconds);

        WifiManager wm = (WifiManager)getSystemService(Context.WIFI_SERVICE);
        WifiManager.MulticastLock multicastLock = wm.createMulticastLock("mydebuginfo");
        multicastLock.setReferenceCounted(true);
        multicastLock.acquire();

        InetAddress ia = null;
        byte[] buffer = new byte[65535];
        MulticastSocket ms = null;
        int port = 4321;
        try
        {
            ia = InetAddress.getByName("226.1.1.1");
            DatagramPacket dp = new DatagramPacket(buffer, buffer.length,ia,port);
            ms = new MulticastSocket(port);
            ms.setReuseAddress(true);
            ms.joinGroup(ia);

            while (true)
            {
                ms.receive(dp);
                String s = new String(dp.getData(),0,dp.getLength());
                Seconds.setText(s);
            }
            }
        catch (UnknownHostException e)
        {
            Seconds.setText(e.getMessage());
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            Seconds.setText(e.getMessage());
        }
    }

    @Override
     public boolean onCreateOptionsMenu(Menu menu)
    {
        // Inflate the menu; this adds items to the action bar if it is present.
        getMenuInflater().inflate(R.menu.main, menu);
        return true;
    }
}

Can anyone tell me how to use above code so that I may receive the data every second and display that in the TextView?

Thank u all in advance

share|improve this question
    
The answer is in the question. Use an AsyncTask. It's well documented in the android documentation. Try something, and if you're stuck, paste your code here. The current code doesn't show any attempt at using AsyncTask. –  JB Nizet Jul 13 '13 at 16:03
1  
@JBNizet AsyncTasks are not supposed to be used for longer lasting activities, merely for things lasting a few seconds. I came across that just a few days ago. –  Ridcully Jul 13 '13 at 16:06
    
OK. You probably know better than me. Why is an AsyncTask that runs continuously not as good as a manually started thread? –  JB Nizet Jul 13 '13 at 16:10
    
Depending on OS version and target SDK, AsyncTasks may be queued to run one at a time. This means that one long-running AsyncTask will prevent the others from running. –  Edward Falk Jul 13 '13 at 16:32
    
@EdwardFalk That's exactly what I ran into lately :-/ –  Ridcully Jul 13 '13 at 18:50
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

AsyncTask does not really for your use case. If the background task needs to run continuously, you'd better just start a new thread. In the thread use a handler to communicate values to the UI. In the callback method of the handler, you can update the gui.

More info on handlers:

  1. http://mobileorchard.com/android-app-developmentthreading-part-1-handlers/

  2. http://www.vogella.com/articles/AndroidBackgroundProcessing/article.html

  3. http://developer.android.com/reference/android/os/Handler.html

Or google for good examples to get this going.

Edit:

Ok, what you need to do is start a new thread and in the run method put the part that reads from the socket. You class create the thread as in inner class, something like:

class SocketThread extends Thread {
    private final Handler mHandler;
    private final WifiManager mWifiManager;
    SocketThread(Handler handler, WifiManager wifiManager) {
        mHandler = handler;
    }
    @override public void run() {
        // socket code goes here
        // whenever you receive a part that should update the ui,
        // do something like:
        final String s = new String(dp.getData(),0,dp.getLength());
        mHandler.post(new Runnable() {
            @override
            public void run() {
                update(s);
            }
        });
    }
}

Then in your onCreate() create a handler and an instance of this thread and start it.

...
super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
EditText Seconds;
Seconds =(EditText)findViewById(R.id.Seconds);

WifiManager wm = (WifiManager)getSystemService(Context.WIFI_SERVICE);
Handler handler = new Handler();
SocketThread thread = new SocketThread(handler, wm);
thread.start();
...

Also define a method update in you activity. Here you will receive the text you want to set. This method will look like this:

public void update(String s) {
    Seconds.setText(s);
}

I advice you to save the seconds variable (the edittext) as a global class variable. This way you can write to it from the update method without having to findById it first.

I edited your code a bit, it may have to do with the wifi code. I am not familiar with this part of the framework. But I can imagine it has something to do with the WifiManager and connecting to it. If this doesn't work, set a breakpoint and step through it, you'll see where it stops doing anything.

package com.example.timing;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.DatagramPacket;
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.MulticastSocket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.content.Context;
import android.net.wifi.WifiManager;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.os.Handler;
import android.view.Menu;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.EditText;

public class MainActivity extends Activity {
    EditText Seconds;   
    String s;
    Button button;
    byte[] buffer = new byte[65535];
    InetAddress ia = null;
    int port = 4321;     
    DatagramPacket dp = new DatagramPacket(buffer, buffer.length,ia,port);
    MulticastSocket ms = null;

    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);     
        Seconds = (EditText) findViewById(R.id.et_time);    
        WifiManager wm = (WifiManager)getSystemService(Context.WIFI_SERVICE); 

        Handler handler = new Handler();
        SocketThread thread = new SocketThread(handler, wm);
        thread.start();
    }



    class SocketThread extends Thread  {
        private final Handler mHandler;

        SocketThread(Handler handler, WifiManager wifiManager) {
            mHandler = handler;
        }
        @Override 
        public void run() {
            // socket code goes here            
            try {     
                wm.setWifiEnabled(true);        
                WifiManager.MulticastLock multicastLock = wm.createMulticastLock("multicastLock");
                multicastLock.setReferenceCounted(true);        
                multicastLock.acquire();            

                ia = InetAddress.getByName("226.1.1.1");         
                ms.setReuseAddress(true);
                ms.joinGroup(ia);

                while(true) {
                ms.receive(dp);     
                    s = new String(dp.getData(),0,dp.getLength());
                    update(s);
                }
            } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
                update(e.getMessage());
            } catch (IOException e) {
                update(e.getMessage());
            }       
        }
    }


    public void update(String s)
    {
        Seconds.setText(s);
    }   

    @Override
    public boolean onCreateOptionsMenu(Menu menu)
    {
        // Inflate the menu; this adds items to the action bar if it is present.
        getMenuInflater().inflate(R.menu.main, menu);
        return true;
    }


} 
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Nickmartens1980 thank u for ur precious siggestion. I had gone through the handlers.But i am not able to understand that how to implement it in my code. I will be very thankful to u if u help me in incorporating the handlers in my code. My requirement is to display the data received from the network socket.The source code is same as in the post. Thanking u –  chandradeo kumar Jul 14 '13 at 5:05
    
I added some more info on how to implement this. Instead of posting the runnable you can also post a message to the handler and create it with a callback function. Then you can handle the message in the callback and you can make the thread a static inner class. This is safer and a bit better. But you'd first try it like this, and then if it works try converting it to using messages. You'll find examples in the first part of the post. The difference between static inner classes and non-static inner classes is that static inner classes do not have a implicit reference to the parent class –  nickmartens1980 Jul 14 '13 at 9:30
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You should not use AsyncTask for longer lasting activities - use a simple Thread and a Handler instead. In the thread, you do the WI-FI stuff (basically your while(true) loop) and whenever you want to update the UI, you pass a message to the Handler and handle the message within the UI thread.

For further information, please read the famous Painless Threading post from the Android Developers Blog.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Have a look through Handlers and Services

Do you only need to collect the data while your app is visible? The way you approach this challenge is very dependant on the needs and lifecycle of the data and communication.

AsyncTask is normally used to do one off jobs on a separate thread and then notify main thread when done.

Possibly look into a service as it is intended for long running jobs.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Stewart i need to read the data from the network and display that data in realtime into the TextView.Every second the textView control has to be updated. –  chandradeo kumar Jul 13 '13 at 18:35
    
@nickmartens1980 has given a good breakdown on how to use a thread. Just bare in mind you may want to do some cleanup in onStop() or onDestroy() of the activity. If you need to read the data while the activity is not visible, then a service is probably worth looking into. –  Stewart Jul 14 '13 at 13:55
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