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According to page 29 of Python Essential Reference (4th Edition) by David Beazley:

directly writing a raw UTF-8 encoded string such as 'Jalape\xc3\xb1o' simply produces a nine-character string U+004A, U+0061, U+006C, U+0061, U+0070, U+0065, U+00C3, U+00B1, U+006F, which is probably not what you intended.This is because in UTF-8, the multibyte sequence \xc3\xb1 is supposed to represent the single character U+00F1, not the two characters U+00C3 and U+00B1.

Shouldn't this be 8 characters - not 9? He says: \xc3\xb1 is supposed to represent the single character.

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3 Answers 3

No, the statement is correct.

In UTF-8 \xc3\xb1 is supposed to represent a single character. That is, if you decoded the string from UTF-8, you'd get a single character and therefore 8 characters.

However, in the particular example the string is treated as a raw sequence of characters and not UTF-8. Therefore, the two octets result in two characters.

I could be going a bit forward but see the following output of ipython:

In [1]: b'Jalape\xc3\xb1o'
Out[1]: b'Jalape\xc3\xb1o'

In [2]: len(b'Jalape\xc3\xb1o')
Out[2]: 9

In [3]: b'Jalape\xc3\xb1o'.decode('utf8')
Out[3]: 'Jalapeño'

In [4]: len(b'Jalape\xc3\xb1o'.decode('utf8'))
Out[4]: 8

In [5]: 'Jalape\xf1o'
Out[5]: 'Jalapeño'

The code above is for Python 3. For Python 2, byte strings (b'Jalape\xc3\xb1o') would be replaced with regular strings ('Jalape\xc3\xb1o'), and regular strings would be replaced with unicode strings (u'Jalape\xf1o').

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ah.. okay.. just to confirm: I want to write J a l a p e funny-n-char o so i create a "Raw UTF-8" by doing 'Jalape\xyy\xyyo' BUT instead of treating \xyy\xyy as a SINGLE-UTF-8 character, Python instead creates two funny charactes: Jalape n1-funny n2-funny o. Whereas if i had just written it as: b'Jalape\xyy\xyyo' (a bytes string) all would have been well! And as a bonus since this is a funny bytes thingy i could have used b'whatevr'.decode() to convert it to a normal run of the mill python-default-Unicode string. Yes/No? –  Vek.M1234 Jul 13 '13 at 17:20
    
No. Are you using Python 2 or Python 3? In Python 2, a regular string is the same thing as bytes string in Python 3; and in Python 3, a regular string is the same thing as unicode string in Python 2 :). It's a bit confusing. I don't know what the exact purpose of that chapter was but usually if you wanted to write Jalapeño, you'd put 'Jalape\xf1o' (or u'Jalape\xf1o' in Python 2), using the unicode character code rather than UTF-8 bytes. –  Michał Górny Jul 13 '13 at 21:15
    
well.. a bytes string is a string with each char in ASCII range 0-255 (8 bit ASCII) so if you have b'AbCd funny-char1 funny-char2' each char is 1 byte long (8 bits); or in other words: funny-char1 can either belong to Latin-1 or 7-bit-ASCII charset - and it so happens Python2 has this as a default for string literals, therefore if i write 'Jalapeño' each char is 1 byte long - Assuming that ñ lies in Latin-1 or I couldn't write it. –  Vek.M1234 Jul 14 '13 at 1:57
    
In Python 3, the default string literal is stored as Unicode which is just a table of code-points that map numbers to characters; the Unicode encoding (UTF-8, UTF-16) adds structure to the numbers therefore you can have multiple bytes representing 1 character - this is the default for string literals in Unicode. (i'm using Python 3.2) –  Vek.M1234 Jul 14 '13 at 1:58
    
No, it's not really ASCII. Byte string stores arbitrary binary data without encoding defined. You are usually responsible for defining the encoding, or in some cases Python implicitly assumes one. And there's no such thing as 8-bit ASCII :). The first 256 characters of Unicode are ISO-8859-1 and that encoding is somehow implicitly assumed in the example. –  Michał Górny Jul 14 '13 at 7:49

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/comp.lang.python/1boxbYjhClg

Joshua Landau (answering my question wrote)

"directly writing a raw UTF-8 encoded string such as 'Jalape\xc3\xb1o' simply produces a nine-character string U+004A, U+0061, U+006C, U+0061, U+0070, U+0065, U+00C3, U+00B1, U+006F, which is probably not what you intended.This is because in UTF-8, the multi- byte sequence \xc3\xb1 is supposed to represent the single character U+00F1, not the two characters U+00C3 and U+00B1."

Correct.

My original question was: Shouldn't this be 8 characters - not 9?

No, Python tends to be right on these things.

He says: \xc3\xb1 is supposed to represent the single character. However after some interaction with fellow Pythonistas i'm even more confused.

You would be, given the way he said it.

With reference to the above para: 1. What does he mean by "writing a raw UTF-8 encoded string"??

Well, that doesn't really mean much with no context like he gave it.

In Python2, once can do 'Jalape funny-n o'. This is a 'bytes' string where each glyph is 1 byte long when stored internally so each glyph is associated with an integer as per charset ASCII or Latin-1. If these charsets have a funny-n glyph then yay! else nay! There is no UTF-8 here!! or UTF-16!! These are plain bytes (8 bits).

Unicode is a really big mapping table between glyphs and integers and are denoted as Uxxxx or Uxxxx-xxxx.

Waits for our resident unicode experts to explain why you're actually wrong

UTF-8 UTF-16 are encodings to store those big integers in an efficient manner. So when DB says "writing a raw UTF-8 encoded string" - well the only way to do this is to use Python3 where the default string literals are stored in Unicode which then will use a UTF-8 UTF-16 internally to store the bytes in their respective structures; or, one could use u'Jalape' which is unicode in both languages (note the leading 'u').

Correct.

  1. So assuming this is Python 3: 'Jalape \xYY \xZZ o' (spaces for readability) what DB is saying is that, the stupid-user would expect Jalapeno with a squiggly-n but instead he gets is: Jalape funny1 funny2 o (spaces for readability) -9 glyphs or 9 Unicode-points or 9-UTF8 characters. Correct?

I think so.

  1. Which leaves me wondering what he means by: "This is because in UTF-8, the multi- byte sequence \xc3\xb1 is supposed to represent the single character U+00F1, not the two characters U+00C3 and U+00B1"

He's mixed some things up, AFAICT.

Could someone take the time to read carefully and clarify what DB is saying??

Here's a simple explanation: you're both wrong (or you're both almost right):

As of Python 3:

>>> "\xc3\xb1"
'ñ'
>>> b"\xc3\xb1".decode()
'ñ'

"WHAT?!" you scream, "THAT'S WRONG!" But it's not. Let me explain.

Python 3's strings want you to give each character separately (*winces in case I'm wrong*). Python is interpreting the "\xc3" as "\N{LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH TILDE}" and "\xb1" as "\N{PLUS-MINUS SIGN}"¹. This means that Python is given two characters. Python is basically doing this:

number = int("c3", 16) # Convert from base16
chr(number) # Turn to the character from the Unicode mapping

When you give Python raw bytes, you are saying that this is what the string looks like when encoded -- you are not giving Python Unicode, but encoded Unicode. This means that when you decode it (.decode()) it is free to convert multibyte sections to their relevant characters.

To see how an encoded string is not the same as the string itself, see:

>>> "Jalepeño".encode("ASCII", errors="xmlcharrefreplace")
b'Jalepeño'

Those represent the same thing, but the first (according to Python) is the thing, the second needs to be decoded.

Now, bringing this back to the original:

>>> "\xc3\xb1".encode()
b'\xc3\x83\xc2\xb1'

You can see that the encoded bytes represent the two characters; the string you see above is not the encoded one. The encoding is internal to Python.

I hope that helps; good luck.

¹ Note that I find the "\N{...}" form much easier to read, and recommend it.

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