Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
# include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  int a=5;
  begin:
  if(a)
       printf("%d\n",a);
   a--;
   goto begin;
   return 0;
 }

When a becomes 0 then if condition will not execute then why the output is going to be infinty in this code means

output -

 5
 4
 3
 2
 1
 0
-1
-2
and so on endless
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by fvu, interjay, Cyclone, Siddharth, mu is too short Jul 15 '13 at 3:47

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
what exactly is your question? –  Winks Jul 13 '13 at 19:17
3  
I don't think you copied your code exactly as you compiled it. –  PP. Jul 13 '13 at 19:20
2  
The code works as expected. Does not print 0 like in your output. –  typ1232 Jul 13 '13 at 19:21
2  
... it's not really related to "using goto keyword" –  JeffRSon Jul 13 '13 at 19:26
3  
@AmanSingh then theres no real question here –  Havenard Jul 13 '13 at 19:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the program really does print 0 for you then there might be a serious problem with your compiler (or even your machine...). My suspicion is that it doesn't print 0, but your question is really why the program loops infinitely.

This is because the if-body only contains the print statement. So when a reaches 0 it isn't printed but the lines

a--;
goto begin;

are still executed. The machine will obey, go back to begin and the loop continues. The quickest fix is to put braces around all the statements you want executed when a != 0:

if(a){
    printf("%d\n",a);
    a--;
    goto begin;
}

return 0;

This will make the program only loop until a is 0, after which it returns.

But the real problem is: don't use goto (for this)! This is a perfect situation to use a while loop:

while(a--){
    printf("%d\n", a);
}

return 0;

(The braces around the while-body are not even strictly necessary here, but just good practice)

share|improve this answer
    
Did you mean while(a--)? –  1'' Jul 13 '13 at 21:50
    
That does make more sense –  Kninnug Jul 14 '13 at 0:20

Its because after the if the goto statement is again executed and then the value of a has already become other than 0 . Now, again you get the goto statement and therefore if goes on executing and printing negative values.

Look at it this way :-

The statement

printf("%d\n",a);

is executed only when condition in if is true. TRUE here refers to anything not equal to 0 so, the printf is not executed when a is 0, while it executes for any other value. Now, a-- and goto are executed outside if so they are executed again and again making the condition in if true always and negative values are printed infinitely.

Nevertheless,

My question is , why are you using goto?

share|improve this answer
    
just checking its working, that's it, actually i am learning C and thank you all for the help –  Aman Singh Jul 13 '13 at 19:25
3  
@AmanSingh Keep in mind that unless you have a very good reason for that, you should not use goto. (And you don't probably have a very good reason for that if you just started learning C.) –  user529758 Jul 13 '13 at 19:26
    
@AmanSingh its very old style almost obsolete. Anyway:) –  ROHIT Jul 13 '13 at 19:27
2  
Oh come on!! I haven't said it prints 0 why the downvote on my answer. Please explain yourselves. –  ROHIT Jul 13 '13 at 19:32
1  
Seriously, the downvote was lightning fast without even looking at my answer properly. Can't find out where and when I wrote it prints 0. Just escaped a stroke LOL :D . And despite of writing 0 in output OP clearly states that if will not execute . –  ROHIT Jul 13 '13 at 19:59
if a==1 -> Evaluates to TRUE
if a==0 -> Evaluates to FALSE
if a==-1 -> Evaluates to TRUE

etc.

Therefore it will display numbers in descending order, except 0 which will not display.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.