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I have the following string with this code:

test:='{test}test{test}';

and my idea is to modify it to make it so

{ t e s t } t e s t  { t e s t }

I need is that all text has a space for letter

Could anyone explain me how I do it?

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Even if your question was put 'on hold', you are still allowed to make clarifications or accept an answer that helped you. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 14 '13 at 4:34
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closed as off-topic by Ken White, TLama, Roddy, David Heffernan, Tony Jul 13 '13 at 22:27

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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1 Answer

The following function does the trick:

function SpaceString(const S: string): string;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  SetLength(result, 2*Length(S));
  for i := 1 to Length(S) do
  begin
    result[2*i - 1] := S[i];
    result[2*i] := #32;
  end;
end;

If you don't want a space at the end:

function SpaceString(const S: string): string;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  SetLength(result, 2*Length(S) - 1);
  for i := 1 to Length(S) do
    result[2*i - 1] := S[i];
  for i := 1 to Length(S) - 1 do
    result[2*i] := #32;
end;

or simply truncate (SetLength(result, Length(result) - 1)) the string made in the first version at the end.

That said, I somehow suspect that your real issue is about character encodings. Indeed, a Unicode (UTF-16) string will look like t h i s if interpreted as ASCII (or ANSI), assuming the original string doesn't contain any multibyte characters. [But of course, the 'spaces' aren't actually spaces (#32) in this case, but NUL characters (#0).]

If this really is the case, then you can forget about my function above completely. Instead, you should treat the encodings properly. If you are using Delphi 2009+, the string type is Unicode (two bytes per char); in earlier versions of Delphi, it is not (one byte per char).

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1  
@TLama: I actually prefer my version for performance reasons. Not that it matters in practice (unless the string is huge), but still... Also, I think my implementation is pretty close to how I imagine doing this manually, which happens to be 'in-place'. [Really, your suggested implementation is like SetLength(X, Length(X) + 1) which is generally frowned upon.] –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 13 '13 at 19:54
    
I don't think the question asks for the result to end with a space: I think the question is to change 'ABC' to 'A B C', while your answer would give 'A B C '. –  hvd Jul 13 '13 at 19:57
2  
@hvd: Then make a trivial change to the code. Also, I still suspect that the OP isn't interested in 'decorating' strings at all; I think he is confused about character encodings. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 13 '13 at 19:58
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