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I wrote the following script to read a CSV file:

f = File.open("aFile.csv")
text = f.read
text.each_line do |line|
  if (f.eof?)
    puts "End of file reached"
  else
    line_num +=1
    if(line_num < 6) then
      puts "____SKIPPED LINE____"
      next
    end
  end

  arr = line.split(",")
  puts "line number  = #{line_num}" 
end

This code runs fine if I take out the line:

 if (f.eof?)
     puts "End of file reached"

With this line in I get an exception.

I was wondering how I can detect the end of file in the code above.

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2  
Side note: File inherits from IO; IO has a lineno method, no need for a counter. –  steenslag Jul 13 '13 at 22:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

https://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/218093#946117 talks about this.

content = File.read("file.txt")
content = File.readlines("file.txt")

The above 'slurps' the entire file into memory.

File.foreach("file.txt") {|line| content << line}

You can also use IO#each_line. These last two options do not read the entire file into memory. The use of the block makes this automatically close your IO object as well. There are other ways as well, IO and File classes are pretty feature rich!

I refer to IO objects, as File is a subclass of IO. I tend to use IO when I don't really need the added methods from File class for the object.

In this way you don't need to deal with EOF, Ruby will for you.

Sometimes the best handling is not to, when you really don't need to.

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The issue with read and readlines is they slurp the entire file into memory, which is only safe when you know the file will always fit into memory. foreach is always safe, and runs at nearly the same speed as slurping the entire file, so use foreach unless there are strong technical reasons to do otherwise, such as HAVING to have the entire file in a single string. each_line is the IO instance version of the IO class-method foreach so IO.foreach is equivalent to File.foreach. –  the Tin Man Jul 13 '13 at 21:47
    
Yes, indeed @theTinMan didn't think to bring that distinction up, I think it is mentioned in the documentation, or I just don't think about it any longer, consciously. I will add the point in the answer, it is definitely a selling point. –  vgoff Jul 13 '13 at 21:50
    
It's also important for the OP to understand that it's idiomatic to use the block forms of IO and File methods to avoid the need to close files or check for EOF. It's just another way that Ruby makes programming more sane. –  the Tin Man Jul 13 '13 at 22:06
    
Already done. :) Looks like I was editing that in, while you were commenting about it. –  vgoff Jul 13 '13 at 22:12

Try this short example:

f = File.open(__FILE__)
text = f.read
p f.eof?      # -> true
p text.class #-> String

With f.read you read the whole file into text and reach EOF. (Remark: __FILE__ is the script file itself. You may use you csv-file).

In your code you use text.each_line. This executes each_line for the string text. It has no effect on f.

You could use File#each_line without using a variable text. The test for EOF is not necessary. each_line loops on each line and detects EOF on its own.

f = File.open(__FILE__)
line_num = 0
f.each_line do |line|
  line_num +=1
  if (line_num < 6) 
     puts "____SKIPPED LINE____"
     next
  end

  arr = line.split(",")
  puts "line number  = #{line_num}" 
end
f.close

You should close the file after reading it. To use blocks for this is more Ruby-like:

line_num = 0
File.open(__FILE__) do | f|
  f.each_line do |line|
    line_num +=1
    if (line_num < 6) 
       puts "____SKIPPED LINE____"
       next
  end

    arr = line.split(",")
    puts "line number  = #{line_num}" 
  end
end

One general remark: There is a CSV library in Ruby. Normally it is better to use that.

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Without testing this, it seems you should perform a rescue rather than checking.

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/EOFError.html

file = File.open("aFile.csv")

begin
  loop do
    some_line = file.readline
    # some stuff
  end
rescue EOFError
  # You've reached the end. Handle it.
end
share|improve this answer
    
Performing a rescue for an EOF is not necessarily the best tactic, as it is not exceptional behavior to find an eof at the end of a file. And exceptions should be reserved for exceptional behavior, behavior that probably shouldn't happen, or if it does, it wasn't expected to in the normal flow of things. –  vgoff Jul 14 '13 at 19:58

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