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I am developing a WPF application. I have an ObservableCollection that is bound to a datagrid. All is working fine with this part. If the Collection is updated, the grid is refreshed. If the grid is updated manually, the collection is also updated.

Now, I have a class local property that stores the sum of the Video.Duration property in the collection. This is bound to a Label control. When I add a new entry to the collection (implemented when user drops files on the grid), the sum of duration is calculated and properly displayed. However, when the user updates the value in the cell, this event is not handled.

I have read about INOtifyPropertyChanged and it seems like what I need. However, I don't fully understand the concept.

Here's what i'm thinking: 1. Implement INOtifyPropertyChanged in my video class. 2. Raise the property changed event in the setter of duration property

Now, the sum property is in the main class, how can I subscribe to the propertychanged event so that I can recalculate the total duration whenever one of the video's duration is updated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Depending upon your design preference, you can avoid event subscriptions and their associated memory leaks altogether. If you build your Video class along these lines...

  public class Video : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        public Video(Action summationCallback)
        {
            _summationCallback = summationCallback;
        }
        private readonly Action _summationCallback;
        private double _duration;
        public double Duration
        {
            get { return _duration; }
            set
            {
                if (value != _duration)
                {
                    _duration = value;
                    OnPropertyChanged("Duration");
                    if (_summationCallback != null)
                    {
                        _summationCallback();
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        #region INotifyPropertyChanged Implementation
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
        protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
        {
            var handler = System.Threading.Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref PropertyChanged, null, null);
            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
            }
        }
        #endregion
    }

This class takes a delegate in its constructor and invokes it each time the 'Duration' property changes. To wire it up, you can implement a ViewModel along these lines...

public class MyViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public ObservableCollection<Video> MyCollection { get; set; }
    public MyViewModel()
    {
        MyCollection = new ObservableCollection<Video>();
        Video v = new Video(SummationCallback);
        MyCollection.Add(v);
    }
    private void SummationCallback()
    {
        SumOfAllDurations = MyCollection.Sum(q=>q.Duration)
    }
    private double _sumOfAllDurations;
    public double SumOfAllDurations
    {
        get { return _sumOfAllDurations; }
        set
        {
            if (value != _sumOfAllDurations)
            {
                _sumOfAllDurations = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("SumOfAllDurations");
            }
        }
    }
    #region INotifyPropertyChanged Implementation
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
    {
        var handler = System.Threading.Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref PropertyChanged, null, null);
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

And bind your label to 'SumOfAllDurations'. This strategy will keep everything in synch without resorting to event subscriptions (which would be orphaned if Videos are deleted by the user) and uses the WPF plumbing to handle the binding.

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Thanks! I went with this solution so that I don't have to worry about subscribing/unsubscribing to events. Instead of creating a Model class however, I have implemented a DependencyProperty for the total duration so that the label gets updated everytime the value of total duration is updated. Passing the summation callback was the most important aspect of your answer for me. –  John Ng Jul 15 '13 at 22:44

Your approach sounds good to me. You'll also have to implement INotifyPropertyChanged in your main class, as that is where the Binding for the Label will listen to changes for the Sum property.

Once you have implemented INotifyPropertyChanged in your Video and Main classes, you'll have a NotifyPropertyChanged event. You can subscribe to this event the same way you would to any event:

private void Subscribe()
{
    foreach(var video in _videos)
    {
        video.NotifyPropertyChanged += OnVideoPropertyChanged;
    }
}

private void OnVideoPropertyChanged(object sender, NotifyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    if(e.PropertyName == "Duration")
    {
        this.RecalculateSum();
        this.RaisePropertyChanged("Sum");  //Or call this from inside RecalculateSum()
    }
}

One thing to keep in mind is that you'll want to unsubscribe from the NotifyPropertyChanged event any time a Video is removed, or when you're unloading. This will help prevent memory leaks:

Video.NotifyPropertyChanged -= OnVideoPropertyChanged;
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