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Here is the normal way of catching and throwing exceptions to callee's

def check(a):

    data  = {}

    if not a:
        raise Exception("'a' was bad")

    return data

def doSomething():

    try:
        data = check(None)
    except Exception, e:
        print e

Here is an alternative + a few things I like:

  1. 'data' is always present, the 'check' function could set up some defaults for data, the logic is then contained within the function and doesn't have to be repeated. Also means that a dev can't make the mistake of trying to access data when an exception has occurred. (data could be defined at the very top of 'doSomething' function + assigned some defaults)
  2. You don't have to have try/excepts everywhere cluttering up the 'doSomething' functions

    def check(a):
    
        errors = []
        data = {}
    
        if not a:
            errors.append("'a' was bad")
    
        return data, errors
    
    def doSomething():
    
        data, errors = check(None)
        if errors:
            print errors
    

Is there anything wrong with it? what are people's opinions?

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3 Answers 3

There are times when the second approach can be useful (for instance, if you're doing a sequence of relatively independent operations and just want to keep a record of which ones failed). But if your goal is to prevent continuing in an incorrect state (i.e., not "make the mistake of trying to access data when an exception has occurred"), the second way is not good. If you need to do the check at all, you probably want to do it like this:

def check(a):
    data  = {}
    if not a:
        raise Exception("'a' was bad")
    return data

def doSomething():
    data = check(None)
    # continue using  data

That is, do the check and, if it succeeds, just keep going. You don't need to "clutter up" the code with except. You should only use try/except if you can actually handle the error in some way. If you can't, then you want the exception to continue to propagate, and if necessary, propagate all the way up and stop the program, because that will stop you from going on to use data in an invalid way.

Moreover, if it's possible to continue after the check but still "make the mistake" of accessing invalid data, then you didn't do a very good check. The point of the check, if there is one, should be to ensure that you can confidently proceed as long as the check doesn't raise an exception. The way you're doing it, you basically do the check twice: you run check, and then you check for an exception. Instead, just run the check. If it fails, raise an exception. If it succeeds, go on with your code. If you want the check to distinguish recoverable and unrecoverable errors and log the unrecoverable ones, then just do the logging in the check.

Of course, in many cases you can make it even simpler:

def doSomething():
    data.blah()
    # use data however you're going to use it

In other words, just do what you're going to do. You will then get an exception if you do something with data that doesn't work. There's often no reason to put in a separate explicit check. (There are certainly valid reasons for checks, of course. One would be if the actual operation is expensive and might fail at a late stage, so you want to check for validity upfront to avoid wasting time on an operation that will fail after a long computation. Another reason might be if the operation involves I/O or concurrency of some kind and could leave some shared resource in an invalid state.)

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you can still raise an exception, catch it and print an error message or log the error - without having to stop program execution at that point; exceptions increase code readability by alerting the reader what errors may happen with that piece of code. –  user1669710 Jul 13 '13 at 23:40
    
@user1669710: You can, but not if you care about continuing with invalid data. Also, if you know at the time the exception is raised that it's not really a big deal, you should just use a warning instead. –  BrenBarn Jul 13 '13 at 23:44
    
It sometimes useful to put one try/except around a long suite of statements -- even most of the script -- in order to do clean-up if anything goes wrong during the process. This allows the process to fail "gracefully" and terminate leaving things in the best state possible. –  martineau Jul 14 '13 at 0:28

Some years from now, when you read your own code again and try to figure out what on earth you were trying to do, you'll be glad for all the clutter of the try-excepts that help make perfectly obvious what is an error and what is data.

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Depends how good of a programmer you are + comments ;) –  Metalstorm Jan 24 at 15:52
    
One does not simply comment on python code. –  santosh.ankr Jan 24 at 19:38

try/excepts are not clutter; They increase the code readability by indicating that this piece of code can "expect" an exception. If you mix your logic-"ifs" with error-handling "ifs" - you may lose some readability in your code.

Further, if you know 'a' being None is the only kind of error you will have, you can write an if and handle it this way; Makes sense in this simple example you gave.

However, if a different error happens, an exception is raised anyway!

I wouldn't recommend to use it as a general programming practice to avoid try/except anywhere. It is acknowledging and marking places in code where exceptions happen.

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