Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Practically, I want to know how to use an array value for another array's size declaration. I have this test-code :

main(){

int sz[3]={1,2,3};

int track1[ sz[0] ]={111};
int track2[ sz[1] ]={222,222};
int track3[ sz[2] ]={333,333,333};

printf("%d %d %d\n", track1[0],track2[1],track3[2]);

}

These are the warnings and errors I get:

test2.c: In function ‘main’:
test2.c:4: error: variable-sized object may not be initialized
test2.c:4: warning: excess elements in array initializer
test2.c:4: warning: (near initialization for ‘track1’)
test2.c:5: error: variable-sized object may not be initialized
test2.c:5: warning: excess elements in array initializer
test2.c:5: warning: (near initialization for ‘track2’)
test2.c:5: warning: excess elements in array initializer
test2.c:5: warning: (near initialization for ‘track2’)
test2.c:6: error: variable-sized object may not be initialized
test2.c:6: warning: excess elements in array initializer
test2.c:6: warning: (near initialization for ‘track3’)
test2.c:6: warning: excess elements in array initializer
test2.c:6: warning: (near initialization for ‘track3’)
test2.c:6: warning: excess elements in array initializer
test2.c:6: warning: (near initialization for ‘track3’)
test2.c:8: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘printf’

What's the problem here, and ovarall is this even possible, what I've tried ?

share|improve this question
    
Are you compiling as C or C++? – Ben Voigt Jul 14 '13 at 0:25
    
Please refer to: stackoverflow.com/questions/3082914/… for a similar question. – lsk Jul 14 '13 at 0:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you have an initializer, you can't really have a variable number of elements. Just leave it out and let the compiler count the number of values.

int track1[]={111};
int track2[]={222,222};
int track3[]={333,333,333};

Without an initializer, your code will work in C (using C99 variable-length arrays) and in C++ by adding the constexpr keyword to the declaration of sz.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried using const int sz[] and it did not work...and then I saw your pointer to constexpr. Thanks. – lsk Jul 14 '13 at 0:38

Ben has answered the static array question already. The other possibility is to use dynamically allocated arrays. For example

int *track1 = (int *)allocate_int_array(sz[0]);
int *track2 = (int *)allocate_int_array(sz[1]);
int *track3 = (int *)allocate_int_array(sz[2]);

This will give you the option of reading track* array sizes from sz[] as well as using track1, 2 and 3 pointers as arrays in the rest of the code. Ofcourse, freeing and other malloc pitfals apply.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.