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How does Python seed its Mersenne twister pseudorandom number generator? It is based off of the clock somehow? If so, is the seed found when the random module is imported or when it is first called?

Python's documentation does not seem to have the answer.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The seed is based on the clock or (if available) an operating system source. The random module creates (and hence seeds) a shared Random instance when it is imported, not when first used.

References

Python docs for random.seed:

random.seed(a=None, version=2)

Initialize the random number generator.

If a is omitted or None, the current system time is used. If randomness sources are provided by the operating system, they are used instead of the system time (see the os.urandom() function for details on availability).

Source of random.py (heavily snipped):

from os import urandom as _urandom

class Random(_random.Random):

    def __init__(self, x=None):
        self.seed(x)

    def seed(self, a=None, version=2):
        if a is None:
            try:
                a = int.from_bytes(_urandom(32), 'big')
            except NotImplementedError:
                import time
                a = int(time.time() * 256) # use fractional seconds

# Create one instance, seeded from current time, and export its methods
# as module-level functions.  The functions share state across all uses
#(both in the user's code and in the Python libraries), but that's fine
# for most programs and is easier for the casual user than making them
# instantiate their own Random() instance.

_inst = Random()

The last line is at the top level, so it is executed when the module is loaded.

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In modern versions of python (c.f. http://svn.python.org/projects/python/branches/release32-maint/Lib/random.py) Random.seed tries to use 32 bytes read from /dev/urandom. If that doesn't work, it uses the current time: (a is an optional value which can be used to explicitly seed the PRNG.)

    if a is None:
        try:
            a = int.from_bytes(_urandom(32), 'big')
        except NotImplementedError:
            import time
            a = int(time.time() * 256) # use fractional seconds
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From this answer, I found the source of random.py. In the Random class, the seed is set when the object is constructed. The module instantiates a Random object and uses it for all of the module methods. So if the random number is produced with random.random() or another module method, then the seed was set at the time of the import. If the random number is produced by another instance of Random, then the seed was set at the time of the construction of that instance.

From the source:

# Create one instance, seeded from current time, and export its methods
# as module-level functions.  The functions share state across all uses
#(both in the user's code and in the Python libraries), but that's fine
# for most programs and is easier for the casual user than making them
# instantiate their own Random() instance.
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